Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “theft”

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canada • cindy raymond • dead agenting (black pr, smear campaign) • duke snyder • fair game • federal bureau of investigation (fbi) • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • gerald bennett wolfe • gregory willardson • harassment • henning heldt • infiltration • internal revenue service (irs) • jane kember • judge charles r. richey • lawsuit • legal • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • mitchell hermann (also, "mike cooper") • morrison j. "mo" budlong • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operation snow white • richard "dick" weigand • theft • wiretap
36 matching items found.
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Oct 12, 2006
Managing Anger // Kenneth Anger speaks out on phones, artistic theft and Scientology — NOW Magazine
Type: Press
Author(s): Glenn Sumi
Source: NOW Magazine
Kenneth Anger doesn’t have a phone and for the past year he’s been living in a Los Angeles hotel that doesn’t take messages. "I’ve managed to do all my various things without one," he informs me on a cellphone handed to him by his assistant after much muffled talk about how to operate the bloody thing. "I got so irritated with people calling me when I was meditating or writing. If you want to get me, try mental telepathy!" Those aren’t ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Mar 19, 1998
Church of Scientology probes Herald reporter - Investigation follows pattern of harassment — Boston Herald
Type: Press
Author(s): Jim MacLaughlin, Andrew Gully
Source: Boston Herald
The Church of Scientology, stung by a five-part series in the Boston Herald that raised questions about its practices, has hired a private investigator to delve into the Herald reporter's private life. The Rev. Heber Jentzsch, president of the Church of Scientology International, confirmed that the church's Los Angeles law firm hired the private investigative firm to look into the personal life of reporter Joseph Mallia, who wrote the series. "This investigation will have to look at what's riving this" coverage, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Apr 27, 1992
L. Ron Hubbard blamed for spying on 'enemies' — Toronto Star (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bruce DeMara
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
In the summer of 1973, dedicated Scientologist Bryan Levman left the yacht of church founder L. Ron Hubbard with a new title and a mandate he believed allowed him to infiltrate police agencies and steal government files. For three years, Levman oversaw a series of covert intelligence operations as deputy guardian for Canada, aimed at attacking the "enemies" of Scientology, founded by Hubbard in the mid-1950s. Levman left the church in 1976 in some disillusionment — "it didn't deliver what it ...
Apr 23, 1992
Ex-Scientology boss testifies // She 'ran the agents' — Toronto Sun (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bill Dunphy
Source: Toronto Sun (Canada)
The former head of Scientology's Canadian intelligence network has identified one of his underlings as being responsible for "running" agents the church had planted in several police and government agencies. Bryan Levman was testifying yesterday at the criminal trial of the Church of Scientology of Toronto and five Scientologists. Levman said defendant Jacqueline Matz "ran the agents" who got jobs in the mid-1970s with the RCMP, the OPP, Metro Police and the attorney-general's office in order to pass information back to ...
Aug 4, 1991
Town terrorized for fighting church — Winnipeg Sun
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Winnipeg Sun
When Narconon comes to town, the Church of Scientology — and trouble — follows, residents of Newkirk, Okla. warned yesterday. Newkirk civic leaders were threatened and harassed by the controversial church and its private investigators after they opposed a Narconon treatment centre set up on Indian territory near the small, rural town in 1989, Mayor Gary Bilger said. "We had three investigators in our little town of 2,300 off and on for weeks," he said. "My little boy was 11 years ...
Apr 23, 1991
Scientology church on trial in Canada — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Type: Press
Author(s): W. Richard Reynolds
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
The Church of Scientology goes on trial here this morning, charged with stealing thousands of documents from government offices and law firms. It is the first time that a church has been put on trial in Canada. The trial is expected to be long and drawn-out. Various motions on legal technicalities must be dealt with first, a process that could take months. The trial is the result of eight years of legal wrangling. It began in 1983, when 110 police officers ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Burglaries and Lies Paved a Path to Prison — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
It began with the title of a fairy tale — Snow White. That was the benign code name Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard gave to an ominous plan that would envelop his church in scandal and send its upper echelon to prison, a plan rooted in his ever-deepening fears and suspicions. Snow White began in 1973 as an effort by Scientology through Freedom of Information proceedings to purge government files of what Hubbard thought was false information being circulated worldwide to ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jul 11, 1989
[...] prevented her from getting mental care [exact date unknown; incomplete] — Tampa Tribune (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Tampa Tribune (Florida)
[...] Wakefield now repudiates the agreement, claiming she was pressured into signing it, and aggressively seeks forums — in the press, on radio shows, in churches — to denounce Scientology. "I don't care what the legal repercussions are at this point," she told the Tribune recently. "I want people in this area to know what Scientology is about. I want them to know it's a satanic cult." The church has been the center of controversy since it was founded by science ...
Jul 26, 1988
Scientology church offers to aid poor if charges dropped — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Peter Moon
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
In what may be an unprecedented legal manoeuvre, the Church of Scientology of Toronto has offered to make substantial cash donations to community agencies working with the elderly and the poor if criminal charges against it are dropped. The offer was made yesterday in a letter written by the church’s lawyer, Clayton Ruby, and delivered to Ontario Attorney-General Ian Scott’s office. The church is charged with several counts of theft by church members of photocopies of confidential documents from Ontario Government ...
Dec 2, 1984
Sect will ask court to quash warrant — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
The Church of Scientology of Toronto will petition the Supreme Court of Ontario Monday asking that a search warrant executed last year be quashed, although the Ontario Provincial Police have already used it to raid the sect's headquarters and seize 14 million documents. Investigators armed with the warrant raided the sect's Toronto headquarters in March 1983 and seized 904 boxes of papers and documents believed to substantiate suspected sect fraud, conspiracy, breaking and entering and theft, according to the warrant ...
May 31, 1983
Scientology defectors charge 'dirty tricks' in Boston — Boston Globe
Type: Press
Author(s): Ben Bradlee Jr.
Source: Boston Globe
Robert Dardano and Warren Friske were trusted members of the Boston mission of the Church of Scientology in the mid-1970s when they say they were recruited to join a group of other church members intent on carrying out "dirty tricks" against critics and others deemed enemies of the church in this area. The activities of the group included break-ins, the theft of documents, harassment and misrepresentation, according to sworn testimony by Dardano in Florida last year and affidavits from him and ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
May 9, 1982
Ex-Scientologists describe illegal activities — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John Harwood
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
CLEARWATER — Why, Robert Dardano was asked, had he done it — why had he participated with other Scientologists in burglaries and theft of documents and smear campaigns against the church's perceived enemies? Because he was convinced, the slender, soft-spoken Dardano told Clearwater city commissioners, "that Scientology was going to save the planet and free the world. "That we were right and everyone else was wrong," Dardano, a 31-year-old Boston resident, was one of eight witnesses to testify Saturday during commission ...
Sep 15, 1981
Anti-Scientology strategy urged — Clearwater Times (Florida)
Mar 10, 1981
Suit charges Scientologist smear campaign — The Ledger (Florida)
Dec 1, 1980
Scientology's war against judges — The American Lawyer
Type: Press
Author(s): James B. Stewart
Source: The American Lawyer
On September 5, 1980, as U.S. District Court Judge Charles Richey was recuperating from two pulmonary embolisms and exhaustion, lawyers for the Church of Scientology and the Justice Department gathered before Judge Aubrey Robinson, Richey's successor in the two-year-old conspiracy case against 11 members of the Church of Scientology. Judge Richey had already convicted and sentenced nine of the original 11 defendants, but the remaining two, recently extradited from England, were about to go on trial. "Particularly from the standpoint of ...
Feb 8, 1980
Scientology's bizarre manual of dirty tricks — Guardian Unlimited
Jan 25, 1980
The Scientology Papers: Cult order sought to end scientists' criticism — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): John Marshall
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
A 1977 order from the top level of the Church of Scientology sought to silence criticism of the cult by a New York-based organization dedicated to investigating UFOs and claims of psychic wonders.
Jan 25, 1980
The Scientology Papers: Files show spy reported woman's intimate words — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): John Marshall
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
Freelance writer Paulette Cooper is a finely honed, long-haired accumulation of nervous energy. She was dressed with a New Yorker flair that seemed out of context in the small windowless room in the grey dignity of the U. S. District Court building in Washington.
Jan 22, 1980
The Scientology Papers: Big FBI raid led to conspiracy trial of cult leaders Court hears of spying, theft of government files — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): John Marshall
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
About 100 agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation learned on July 6, 1977, that they would be participating two days later in an operation unprecedented in the United States. The notification, described two years later in a Washington court room, said the agents would be raiding offices of an organization that some governments, in the United States, Canada and elsewhere, officially classified as a religion — the Church of Scientology.
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jan 22, 1980
The Scientology Papers: Secret Ontario documents found in U.S. cult's files — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): John Marshall
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
Confidential documents from various Ontario Government offices including an attorney-general's communication about police intelligence operations have been found in U.S. Church of Scientology files. The documents were part of the evidence submitted by federal attorneys in the Washington prosecution of U.S. leaders of the cult on charges of conspiring to steal government documents and obstruct justice by cover-ups and by kidnapping an informer. Of 12 indicted, including two in Britain and the informer, nine have been tried, convicted and sentenced by ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jan 9, 1980
Court tangle gave Scientology its first 'martyrs' — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Charles Stafford
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jan 9, 1980
Scientology brings 4 years of discord — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Jan 9, 1980
Shedding light on Scientology's dark side — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Nov 27, 1979
Memo tells of plan to safeguard 'Red Box' documents — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: news.google.com
Nov 27, 1979
Now it's time for action — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
Nov 24, 1979
Church's covert activity told — Los Angeles Times (California)
Nov 24, 1979
Cult tried to control newspaper — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Richard Leiby
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
The Church of Scientology plotted to purchase or otherwise "control" the Clearwater Sun by attempting to cut the paper's advertising revenue, discredit reporters and editors and rally readers against it, according to sect documents released Friday.
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Oct 27, 1979
Scientology leaders guilty of conspiracy // Judge convicts nine accused of infiltrating federal agencies — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Rawitch
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
WASHINGTON — Nine Church of Scientology leaders were convicted Friday on charges stemming from a four-year church program to burglarize, bug and infiltrate various federal agencies with which Scientology has battled for two decades. On two occasions during the four-hour court proceeding, a fragile plea-bargaining agreement between the defendants and federal prosecutors almost collapsed. But finally all the legal obstacles presented by defense attorneys were overcome and U.S. Dist. Judge Charles R. Richey pronounced all nine defendants guilty of one count ...
Oct 27, 1979
Scientology members guilty in data thefts — Detroit Free Press
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Detroit Free Press
WASHINGTON — (AP) — A federal judge Friday convicted nine members of the Church of Scientology, including the wife of the founder, of taking part in a major conspiracy to steal government documents about the church. As the defendants and their lawyers clustered in front of him, U.S. District. Judge Charles Richey said the evidence "establishes each and every element" of the crimes that resulted in convictions. RICHEY SET no date for sentencing the defendants, who included Mary Sue Hubbard, wife ...
Oct 26, 1979
Document tells Scientology plans to infiltrate agencies — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Rawitch
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
WASHINGTON — A plan by the Church of Scientology to infiltrate federal agencies with "covert agents" and steal thousands of government documents over a period of nearly four years was outlined Thursday in an unusual document filed in federal court by prosecution and the defense. The 284-page "stipulation of evidence" against nine Scientology leaders was filed with U.S. Dist Judge Charles R. Richey, who is expected to render a verdict today. The defendants have said they expect to be found guilty ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.