Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “Church & State”

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church of scientology celebrity centre international @ 5930 franklin avenue los angeles ca united states • death • dianetics: the modern science of mental health (book) • disconnection • fort harrison hotel (also, flag land base) @ 210 south fort harrison avenue clearwater fl united states • germany • girlfriends • homosexuality • jeffrey g. "jeff" quiros • john travolta • kelly preston • kirstie alley • lawsuit • lisa mcpherson • nancy cartwright • nicole kidman • parker stevenson • real estate • stephanie tarnoff • the way to happiness (twth) • thomas c. tobin • tilman hausherr • tom cruise • transwert • world institute of scientology enterprises (wise)
Reference materials Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre International @ 5930 Franklin Avenue Los Angeles CA United StatesWikipedia: Celebrity Centre
7 matching items found between Jan 1997 and Dec 1997. Furthermore, there are 351 matching items for all time not shown.
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Dec 1, 1997
Religion's search for a home base — New York Times
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Douglas Frantz
Source: New York Times
CLEARWATER, Fla. — In 1975, L. Ron Hubbard, the flamboyant founder of the Church of Scientology, was intent on finding a home base for his religion, which had come under criticism in several countries. The result was Operation Goldmine. Late that year, a dummy corporation paid $2.3 million in cash to buy the Fort Harrison Hotel, a historic building that was the symbolic heart of downtown Clearwater. The buyer was identified as the United Churches of Florida, an unknown organization. A ...
Oct 31, 1997
In her final years, Scientologist spent $175,000 — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: lisamcpherson.org, pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Lisa McPherson turned to the Church of Scientology in her 20s as she tried to shed the emotional baggage of a rocky youth. By age 36, with a high school education, she was earning a handsome salary as a sales representative in Clearwater. Today, as the church tries to rebut assertions that it caused her sudden death, it also credits Scientology for her successes in life. But McPherson's turnaround came at a financial price. From 1991 until she died in December ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jul 25, 1997
A necessary separation // In proposed Valley charter school, church-state line isn't clear enough — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Los Angeles Board of Education should reject the controversial application for the proposed Northwest Charter School in the San Fernando Valley. Why? Because the public school system should not open its doors to potentially sectarian teaching. That is what private schools are for. The author of this charter school petition is a Scientologist, which is no more disqualifying for a public school educator than any other religion. However, Linda Smith, a veteran public school teacher, says she would use the ...
May 9, 1997
When did she die? — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
CLEARWATER — Was it an honest mistake, a slip of the tongue? Or was it the naked truth, carelessly uttered on camera A top official for the Church of Scientology told a German television crew recently that church member Lisa McPherson died in a room at the Fort Harrison Hotel in Clearwater. On its face, the statement marks a major change in Scientology's version of events surrounding McPherson's unexplained death at age 36. It came in the presence of one of ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Apr 14, 1997
Internet firm Luckman surfs rough waters — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Karen Kaplan
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
A visitor to the Internet World trade show in Los Angeles last month would have come away with the impression that Luckman Interactive was an industry powerhouse. The 3-year-old firm, which makes software and Internet directories, hung a giant banner on the side of the Los Angeles Convention Center—the only company to spring for the expense. Its booth was among the biggest at the show, rivaling those of Netscape, Apple Computer and Sun Microsystems. The company has raised more than $20 ...
Feb 25, 1997
Scientology's "Holocaust" // Is Hollywood on the wrong side in Germany's "Church" vs. state furor? — Salon
Type: Press
Author(s): David Hudson
Source: Salon
BERLIN — “Historically inaccurate and totally distasteful." Strong words from Madeleine Albright, who had good reason to apply them. America's new secretary of State was referring to the widely publicized statement by Oliver Stone, Dustin Hoffman and other Hollywood celebrities equating Germany's current treatment of the Church of Scientology with the Holocaust. When she met with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl last week, Albright was committed to bringing up U.S. "concerns" about Germany's treatment of Scientologists. At the same time, she clearly ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jan 1, 1997
Is Scientology keeping Hollywood straight? Celebrities are dropping off the fay rumor mill by joining the religion of the stars — Girlfriends
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Stephanie Tarnoff
Source: Girlfriends
When L. Ron Hubbard penned his ground-breaking book, Dianetics, a shot rang out in Hollywood. The book, now available in more than 32 languages, has sold over 16 million copies since 1950. It has also attracted legions of famous followers to its Church of Scientology in Hollywood and its castle-like Celebrity Centre located in the heart of Tinseltown. During John Travolta's Golden Globe acceptance speech, for example, the church member — long rumored to be gay — thanked L. Ron Hubbard ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.