Scientology Critical Information Directory

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anti-psychiatry • auditing • australia • cost • david miscavige • death • disconnection • e-meter • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • internal revenue service (irs) • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • legal • medical claims • membership • narconon (aka scientology drug rehab) • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operation snow white • protest, picket • real estate • sea organization (sea org, so) • tax matter • tom cruise • united kingdom (uk)
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Page of 211: ⇑ Latest         
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 5 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
picture of LRH; pictures of books “L. Ron Hubbard, Messiah or Madman?”, “Bare-Faced Messiah] VO: Scientology lost its founder in 1986. And the news that Hubbard was no longer sparked a flurry of unofficial biographies. Russell Miller walking down road; picture of LRH RUSSELL MILLER (voice of and on camera): I knew that there was some question mark over L. Ron Hubbard’s background. The church presents a picture of L. Ron Hubbard as being a very extraordinary individual, and was almost ...
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 6 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
BILL KURTIS: Since its emergence in the 1950s, the Church of Scientology has been a source of great fascination. It has spent many of those years at war with the U.S. government, the press, and portions of the public. But behind the headlines are real people who have experienced Scientology firsthand. In this second hour of a special A&E presentation of “Investigative Reports,” we hear directly from those who remain members of the church, and from those who have now left ...
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 7 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
“Operation Clambake” web page VO: The ’90s brought with it a new challenge for the Church of Scientology in the form of the Internet. newspaper article titled “Showdown in Cyberspace”; David Gerard’s web page; web page that says “Why I hate Scientology” GRAHAM BERRY (voice of and on camera): The Internet has been a disaster for Scientology. Netizens, or people who spend a lot of time on the net, have a particular wild west attitude towards the First Amendment. They believe ...
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 8 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
Clearwater picket 1997–Xenu picketing with sign saying “L. Ron Hubbard: Psychotic CON MAN”, other picketers with signs saying “www.scientology-kills.net” “Xenu Crossing (inside a yellow sign on picket sign)”; Deana Holmes with sign saying “Did Standard Tech kill Lisa?”; lecture at Scientology church VO: While church administration is busy dealing with a steady stream of conflict, individual Scientologists are out among the people, spreading Hubbard’s word at every opportunity. MIKE RINDER: Well, you know, the aims of Scientology are a civilization without ...
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 9 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
Crowd of people outside Celebrity Centre in Los Angeles; picture of Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman VO: The high profile role of Scientology’s celebrities– which include America’s most popular actor, Tom Cruise– adds to Scientology’s mystique. footage of Travolta being presented with a “1998 Celebrity with glamour of the year” (?) award from somebody (glass trophy with red and blue hand prints painted on it) JOHN TRAVOLTA (on movie set in Army camouflage outfit) (voice of and on camera): I’m part ...
Dec 14, 1998
Sect Appeal: A&E Examines The Scientology Phenomenon — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Kay McFadden
Source: Seattle Times
Getting religion has never been easy if you're a member of the media. A few years ago, in response to complaints that journalism was neglecting matters of faith, many newspapers expanded the space and staffing devoted to such topics. Television news also began doing more pieces devoted to Promise Keepers, papal policy, mega-churches and the like. Yet most journalists still have a blind spot when it comes to the spiritual quotient in stories. Perhaps the problem lies in the average reporter's ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 13, 1998
High profile couple never pairs church and state — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Mary Jacoby
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
ASHINGTON – Cable News Network legal analyst Greta Van Susteren and her wealthy trial-lawyer husband, John Coale, are a Beltway power couple. She is the co-host of CNN's top-rated Burden of Proof. He is a mover behind the multi-billion-dollar anti-tobacco lawsuits. Both have dined at the White House. And what about the fact they belong to a religion that teaches of Xenu, evil head of the Galactic Confederation? Who flew people to Teegeeack (Earth) 75-million years ago in space ships, chained ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 10, 1998
Scientology wants city's kids — NOW Magazine
More: nowtoronto.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Enzo Di Matteo
Source: NOW Magazine
Quaint Clarkson, tucked away on the westernmost edge of Mississauga, seems as unlikely a place as any to find L. Ron Hubbard, sci-fi-writer-turned-icon and founder of the much-vilified Church of Scientology. But here, just past the picket fences and over the train tracks where the old post office used to be, the portrait that graces Hubbard's opus Dianetics: The Modern Science Of Mental Health – sailor cap, face turned upward, blue sky in the background – hangs in the foyer of ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 9, 1998
Church's complaints take buses off road — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Pinellas County's transit chief pulled 10 buses off the road Sunday after the Church of Scientology complained that the vehicles' side panels contained anti-Scientology advertising. The ads were purchased by church critics and were to be on buses Saturday through Monday as part of a weekend-long protest against Scientology. Each of the 11 ads carried a different message. Among them: "Think for Yourself. Quit Scientology," "Find out why so many people oppose Dianetics and Scientology" and "Why does Scientology lie to ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 6, 1998
McPherson relatives lead protest — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Protesters gather in a somber ceremony outside the Fort Harrison Hotel, where Lisa McPherson spent her final days. CLEARWATER — Relatives of Lisa McPherson made a tear-filled trip Saturday night to the Scientology hotel where she spent her final days under guard and in the grips of a mental breakdown. Her aunt and uncle, Dell and Art Liebreich, and her cousin Kim Krenek led a group of about 60 anti-Scientology protesters who held candles and laid a wreath outside a privacy ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 6, 1998
The life & death of a Scientologist // After 13 years and thousands of dollars, Lisa McPherson finally went 'Clear.' Then she went insane — Washington Post
More: xenutv.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Richard Leiby
Source: Washington Post
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Dec 6, 1998 - "I am L. Ron Hubbard," the woman on the hotel room bed announced in a robotic voice. "I created time 3 billion years ago." She rambled on and on, every outburst dutifully scribbled down by those assigned to watch her. "I can't confront force . . . I need my auditor . . . I want to take a toothbrush and brush the floor until I have a cognition." The jargon of Scientology was ...
Dec 4, 1998
"I see Scientology work every day" [Advertisement] — Los Angeles Times (California)
Dec 1, 1998
Brainwashed! // Scholars of cults accuse each other of bad faith — Lingua Franca
Type: Press
Author(s): Charlotte Allen
Source: Lingua Franca
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY SOCIOLOGY professor Benjamin Zablocki has been studying cults–now called, thanks to academic political correctness, new religious movements, or NRMs–since his graduate school days at Johns Hopkins during the mid-1960s, when he bought a ninety-nine dollar Greyhound bus pass and traveled around the country visiting all the religious communes he could find. "My style of research is participant observation," he explains. "I live with the groups, wash dishes with them, pray with them, and immerse myself in their way of ...
Dec 1, 1998
Scientology pleads not guilty in 1995 death — New York Times
More: link
Nov 23, 1998
State takes middle road against Scientology — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
"I think there was a sense that this was a senseless death," said [Bob] Heyman, whose boss, State Attorney Bernie McCabe, was only beginning to examine the case of Lisa McPherson. Heyman, now in private practice, was preparing to end a 15-year career as a prosecutor. Among McCabe's options: Be aggressive and level a serious charge such as manslaughter, but risk a bruising legal battle with the Church of Scientology, which had taken on much bigger fish than McCabe. He eventually ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 20, 1998
Editorial // Scientology's new tack — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Church of Scientology officials now admit they made a mistake in the case of the Lisa McPherson, who died in the organization's care, but questions remain. hen Pinellas-Pasco State Attorney Bernie McCabe filed two criminal charges against the Church of Scientology last week over Lisa McPherson's death, the reaction of church officials was unusually benign. "We'd like to see how to move forward and put this unfortunate incident behind us," said Mike Rinder, a top Scientology official known more for his ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 18, 1998
For those who were there, Jonestown's a part of each day — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Tim Reiterman
Source: Seattle Times
IN THE '70s, Jim Jones moved his Peoples Temple from San Francisco to Guyana to escape what he saw as persecution. In the U.S., the temple had run a free clinic and a drug-rehab program, but reports from Guyana began detailing brutality. Tim Reiterman was there when 913 people died in what we now call "Jonestown." OAKLAND, Calif. - For 20 years now, they have come to a grassy hillside overlooking San Francisco Bay to share tears, hugs and their private ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 14, 1998
Church of Scientology charged in member's death — CNN
Type: Press
Source: CNN
CLEARWATER, Florida (CNN) — The Church of Scientology was charged by Florida prosecutors Friday in the death of a member. The State Attorney's office in Pinellas County filed the felony charges after a lengthy investigation into the 1995 death of Lisa McPherson. McPherson had been a member of the church for 18 years and, according to relatives, had been talking about leaving the church. McPherson, 36, died December 5, 1995, after being confined for 18 days to a Scientology property called ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 14, 1998
Church of Scientology charged in member's dehydration death — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Justice: Severe dehydration proved fatal to female believer who, family contends, was held against her will. Prosecutor files two felony counts. CLEARWATER, Fla. — The Church of Scientology was charged Friday in the 1995 death of a member whose family claimed she became severely dehydrated after being held against her will for 17 days. Prosecutor Bernie McCabe charged the church with abuse or neglect of a disabled adult and unauthorized practice of medicine, both felonies. The church noted that prosecutors did ...
Nov 14, 1998
Florida charges Scientology in church member's death // 2-year investigation leads to felony filing — New York Times
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Douglas Frantz
Source: New York Times
ORLANDO, Fla., Nov. 13 — Florida prosecutors filed criminal charges today against the Church of Scientology in connection with the death of a church member while she was under the care of Scientologists three years ago. The church's Flag Service Organization, its chief operating arm in Clearwater, Fla., was charged with abuse or neglect of a disabled adult and with the unauthorized practice of medicine in the death of the church member, Lisa McPherson, 36. The felony charges were filed in ...
Nov 14, 1998
Hubbard's teachings guide treatment of mental illness — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
CLEARWATER — When Lisa McPherson left Morton Plant Hospital with her fellow Scientologists, she crossed a line between worlds that differ sharply on how mental illness should be treated. The Scientologists who watched her for the next 17 days relied on the teachings of their late founder, L. Ron Hubbard, who scorned psychiatry and wrote that any apprentice of his mental health practices "knows more and can do more about the mind than any psychiatrist." In contrast, doctors at Morton Plant ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 14, 1998
McPherson's death incites Web protests — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Lucy Morgan
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
In death, Lisa McPherson has gained fame around the world. Internet pages describing her death in the hands of the Church of Scientology have proliferated in Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, French and German. Scientology critics from Copenhagen to San Francisco walk the streets carrying signs that question the Dec. 5, 1995, death of McPherson in Clearwater. Some of those critics will be in Clearwater on the anniversary of her death again this year to picket Scientology buildings. Internet interest in McPherson ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 14, 1998
Scientology charged in member's death — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
The church faces two felony charges in its treatment of Lisa McPherson. The Church of Scientology in Clearwater has been charged with criminal neglect and practicing medicine without a license in the 1995 death of Lisa McPherson, the mentally disturbed Scientologist who turned to outsiders for help before church officials intervened and placed her under their care. Unlicensed Scientology staffers "medicated her without her consent," isolated her and took other measures to treat her physical and mental condition at Scientology's Fort ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 13, 1998
Church of Scientology charged in member's death — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
CLEARWATER (AP) — A prosecutor charged the Church of Scientology on Friday with two felonies in the death of a member whose family claims she became severely dehydrated after being held against her will for 17 days. Lisa McPherson, 36, died in December 1995. She had been under the 24-hour care of church members at the Fort Harrison Hotel, Scientology's international retreat in downtown Clearwater. Her family has claimed she was held against her will after trying to leave the church. ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 10, 1998
Scientologists lose a round in copyright fight — Salon
Type: Press
Author(s): Janelle Brown
Source: Salon
The war between Scientology and its online opponents may have no visible end, but victory in the latest skirmish goes to the Net. Last week, a judge dismissed a request from Bridge Publications (one of the countless subsidiaries of the Church of Scientology) for summary judgment against FACTNet, a nonprofit online anti-cult group that Scientology had accused of duplicating its copyrighted material. FACTNet claims that the copyrighted material — church documents by L. Ron Hubbard that reveal secrets Scientology members normally ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Oct 25, 1998
A place called 'Gold' — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
HEMET, Calif. — Nowhere is Scientology’s trademark self-sufficiency more clearly in evidence than at its $50-million outpost in the arid hills 90 miles east of Los Angeles. Seven hundred Scientology workers put in 60-hour weeks to remaster the scratchy tapes on which the late founder once recorded his lectures; translate his words into more than 30 languages; produce Scientology films, tapes, videos, television commercials, magazines and books; and manufacture e-meters, the electronic devices used in the core Scientology counseling practice called ...
Oct 25, 1998
David Miscavige speaks... — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
In six hours of interviews, Miscavige discussed and defended the organization he has led since age 26. About fears Scientology plans to take over Clearwater: “Oddly enough one thing that we have never attempted to do ... is to promote Scientologists moving to Clearwater. That was never part of the planning. Ever." About what should happen next in Clearwater: “I do think we have to put the past behind us, and that’s why I felt a dialogue should be opened. To ...
Oct 25, 1998
The cornerstones — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
[Picture / Caption: THE FOUNDER: The finale to the L. Ron Hubbard Life Exhibition in Los Angeles is a series of pocket doors displaying 400 proclamations Hubbard received through the years. The Hollywood Boulevard museum, conceived by Miscavige, is open to the public.] [Picture / Caption: PRESERVING HIS WORDS: Titanium capsules, on display in Los Angeles, are part of Scientology’s ongoing $226-million effort to archive Hubbard’s writings. His words are imprinted on stainless steel plates, stored in the capsules, then wrapped ...
Oct 25, 1998
The Man Behind Scientology — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas C. Tobin
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
David Miscavige, the seldom-seen leader of the church, comes forth in his first newspaper interview to talk of a more peaceful time for Scientology. LOS ANGELES — When David Miscavige recounts his rise to power in the Church of Scientology — a journey that began when he quit high school at age 16 — it is mostly a story of war. War against renegade Scientologists. War against Scientology’s critics. War against its one-time arch enemy, the IRS. But Scientology’s 38-year-old leader ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Oct 16, 1998
Letters to the Editor // Defamatory attack — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
In early June, The Globe and Mail distributed an insert published by The Church of Scientology entitled Freedom. This insert contained an article that amounted to a lengthy and defamatory attack on me and my research on new and alternative religions, particularly Scientology itself. As an insert in The Globe and Mail, this Scientology publication and the article about me may have enjoyed a greater degree of credibility than would otherwise have been the case, which prompts my response in these ...
Page 99 of 211: ⇑ Latest         
Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.