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Scientology library: “Auditing”

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auditing • blackmail • confidential preclear (pc) folder • cost • david miscavige • disconnection • e-meter • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • internal revenue service (irs) • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • medical claims • membership • operating thetan (ot) • operation snow white • oxford capacity analysis (aka, "free scientology personality test" aka "u-test" aka "pape test") • purification rundown ("purif") • salary • scientology's "clear" state • sea organization (sea org, so) • supernatural abilities (aka ot powers) • suppressive person (sp) • tax matter • xenu (operating thetan level 3, ot 3, wall of fire)
Reference materials Auditing
276 matching items found.
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Nov 8, 1987
Messiah at the Manor [excerpt from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"] — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
Scientology grew out of the ashes of L Ron Hubbard's 'new science' of Dianetics, which enjoyed a brief vogue in the America of the 1950s then faded to bring its founder close to bankruptcy. In this second extract from the book the Church of Scientology tried to ban, RUSSELL MILLER describes the bizarre, science-fiction basis of the new, highly profitable religion and Hubbard's self-appointed mission to 'save the world' —– L RON HUBBARD had often said: "If a man really wanted ...
Nov 1, 1987
Science fictions [extract from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"] — The Sunday Times (UK)
Jul 19, 1987
Scientologists lose court ruling on tax deductions for donations — Los Angeles Times (California)
Jul 3, 1987
Fees paid by Scientologists to church held deductible — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A federal appeals court has ruled that donations made by Church of Scientology members as part of their religious practices may be claimed as a federal income tax deduction. The U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that set fees paid by Scientologists during their church's individualized religious practices are deductible charitable contributions. The ruling is contrary to one reached recently by the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston, which decided the payments are not ...
Apr 30, 1987
The 'extended sting operation' of Scientology — The Listener
Type: Press
Author(s): John Penycate
Source: The Listener
Panorama's investigation into the Scientologists revealed an organisation which uses its founder's 'mixture of half-practical, half-gobbledegook psychological techniques' to draw large sums of money from its adherents, with threatening consequences if they opt out. Religious cults are a problem. They enslave the minds and empty the pockets of gullible young people, causing heartfelt grief to their families. The Moonies, the Children of God and the other cults have a poor public image, but they almost always operate within the law. The ...
Item contributed by: Martin Poulter
Apr 27, 1987
Panorama: Road to Total Freedom — BBC News
More: transcript
Type: TV
Source: BBC News
Description of video is in italics. VO=VOICEOVER shot of Church of Scientology, Los Angeles; apparently group of ex-members VOICEOVER: The Church of Scientology, one of the largest and richest new religious movements, is being sued for a billion dollars by former members for fraud and breach of trust. They regard Scientology as a dangerous cult. group of Scientologists VO: Yet the church goes on expanding, making converts and claiming it is "The Road to Total Freedom". ''"Panorama" opening credits; while music ...
Tag(s): Annie M. Tidman (aka Annie Broeker aka Annie Logan aka Lisa Mitchell)Apollo (formerly, "Royal Scot Man"; often misspelled "Royal Scotman", "Royal Scotsman")AssaultAuditingAuthor Services, Inc. (ASI) (dba, Galaxy Press) (subsidiary of Church of Spiritual Technology)BBC NewsBlackmailBody thetans (BTs)Church of Scientology International (CSI)Confidential preclear (PC) folderCostCyril Ronald VosperDavid MiscavigeDavid Miscavige: physical violenceDede ReisdorfDeprogrammingDianeticsDisconnectionDon LarsonDoreen Lea GillhamE-MeterExtortionFair gameFort Harrison Hotel (also, Flag Land Base) @ 210 South Fort Harrison Avenue Clearwater FL United StatesFrank NotaroFranklin FreedmanFraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentationFront groupsHana Eltringham WhitfieldHarassmentHarold ClarkeHeber C. JentzschInurementJeffrey A. DubronJerry WhitfieldJohn TravoltaJudge Paul G. Breckenridge Jr.Ken HodenKidnappingL. Ron HubbardL. Ron Hubbard's credentialsL. Ron Hubbard's deathLawrence LevyLawsuitLouis Jolyon WestLudis BirssMary ClarkeMary Sue (Whipp) HubbardMembershipMV Freewinds (formerly, La Bohème)Narconon (aka Scientology drug rehab)Nazi labellingNorman F. StarkeyOperating Thetan (OT)Patrick D. "Pat" Broeker (aka Mike Mitchell)Private investigator(s)Protest, picketRecruitmentReligious cloakingReligious Research Foundation (RRF)Ruth ClarkeSaint Hill Manor @ East Grinstead (UK)Scientology's "Clear" stateScott MayerSea Organization (Sea Org, SO)Supernatural abilities (aka OT powers)Suppressive person (SP)Thea GreenbergThreatTraining Routines (TRs)United Kingdom (UK)Valerie StansfieldWogXenu (Operating Thetan level 3, OT 3, Wall of Fire)
Apr 21, 1987
Scientology appeal rejected — Daily News
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Daily News
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court let stand Monday a ruling that could force the Church Scientology of California to post a $60 million bond — an amount the church said would bankrupt it — to appeal a judgment against it. The court refused to hear arguments in the case, brought by the church seeking review of a California appeals court ruling. "We feel it's a grave injustice,” said Kathleen Thorn, president of the Church of Scientology of California. She refused to ...
Apr 21, 1987
Supreme court turns down Scientology plea / Way cleared for former member to start seizing church assets to satisfy award of $30 million — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: scientology-lies.com, link
Type: Press
Author(s): David G. Savage, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Supreme Court on Monday rebuffed pleas by the Church of Scientology of California for relief from having to post a bond of up to $60 million to guard its assets against seizure while it appeals a huge Los Angeles jury award. Scientology lawyers have argued that payment of the bond would plunge the church into bankruptcy. But the state court judge who presided over the jury trial contends that the controversial organization's claims of poverty are untrue. The Supreme Court's ...
Jan 1, 1987
Scientology hit with suit for $1 billion — Tampa Tribune (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Tampa Tribune (Florida)
LOS ANGELES (AP) — More than 400 current and former Scientologists filed a $1 billion suit against the church Wednesday, alleging efforts to compromise or pay off two Florida judges and siphon $100 million to foreign bank accounts. The class action filed by attorney Lawrence Levy contends Church officials or their representatives committed fraud and breached fiduciary duties. It says information obtained during purportedly confidential "auditing" sessions with a lie detector-like device is used "for purposes of blackmail and extortion." The ...
Oct 27, 1986
The prophet and profits of Scientology — Forbes
Jul 23, 1986
Ex-Scientologist wins $30 million in church suit — Los Angeles Herald Examiner (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Liz Mullen
Source: Los Angeles Herald Examiner (California)
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury awarded $30 million to a former Scientologist, who claimed the church's religious practice of "auditing" caused him to suffer a nervous breakdown. Larry Wollersheim, 37, who was a member of the church for 11 years, was awarded $5 million in compensatory damages and $25 million in punitive damages by the 12-member jury. The trial started last February. "It's a tremendous verdict for human rights," said Leta Schlosser, Wollersheim's attorney. The Church of Scientology, she added, ...
Jul 23, 1986
Scientologists must pay $30 million to critical ex-member — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link, @L.A. Times, differs from scanned version
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury Tuesday awarded $30 million in damages to a former member of the Church of Scientology who said the organization intentionally drove him to the edge of insanity and ruined him financially for criticizing the group. The 12-0 verdict in favor of Larry Wollersheim brought gasps from the Scientologists who packed Judge Ronald Swearinger's court-room, as they had throughout the bitterly contested five-month-long trial. Some sobbed. Wollersheim was awarded $5 million in compensatory damages and $25 ...
Jun 14, 1986
Scientology 'purification' rite used by anti-addiction centres — Toronto Star (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): Lindsay Scotton
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
A controversial "purification" regime used by the Church of Scientology to advance members' spiritual enlightenment is also being used by Narconon, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre, and is being offered at a Toronto health clinic. The "Purification Rundown" used by Narconon and the Lafayette Health Centre uses large vitamin dosages, exercise and long hours in the sauna to "cleanse" the body of accumulated impurities, according to Narconon officials and the health centre's director. Costs of the treatment offered ...
Apr 27, 1986
Suit challenges tactics of church — New York Times
More: nytimes.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Marcia Chambers
Source: New York Times
A former official of the Church of Scientology, testifying at the trial of his suit charging the church with fraud, says church staff members engaged in a pattern of lies, tricks and deception in efforts to keep him from disclosing how the organization operates. The former official, Larry Wollersheim, who says the church should pay him $25 million in damages because it ruined him financially and emotionally, has spent three weeks testifying before a Superior Court jury here. For its part, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Apr 4, 1986
Inside Scientology — Finally [Payment before enlightenment] — L.A. Weekly (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ron Curran, Jennifer Pratt
Source: L.A. Weekly (California)
Payment Before Enlightenment "Total freedom" through Scientology does not come cheap. With registered trademarks affixed to every Scientology term and title, Hubbard's religion sometimes more closely resembles K-mart than, say, Catholicism. Scientology's policy of payment before enlightenment is perhaps the leading cause of questions concerning the church's credibility as an altruistic institution. Although Ken Hoden initially dragged his feet in supplying a promised list of auditing fees because, as he put it, "when you walk into a Baptist church or any ...
Apr 4, 1986
Inside Scientology — Finally [Therapy as religion] — L.A. Weekly (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ron Curran, Jennifer Pratt
Source: L.A. Weekly (California)
Therapy as Religion Though the Berendo Street headquarters is the hub of Scientology activity in Los Angeles, the church's showplace is its Celebrity Center at Franklin and Bronson. A grand gothic chateau built for William Randolph Hearst in the 1920s, this complex of Scientology offices and apartments has retained much of its charm, replete with garden grounds and flowing fountains The idyllic setting is reinforced as you enter the mansion's foyer. The walls are lined with original art, and music from ...
Jan 30, 1986
Mystery followed L. Ron Hubbard throughout life and into death — Telegram-Tribune (San Luis Obispo County)
Jan 29, 1986
L. Ron Hubbard dies of stroke; founder of Church of Scientology — New York Times
More: nytimes.com
Jun 13, 1985
Scientologists try to ease concern on Altadena plans — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Mark Arax
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
ALTADENA — Incorporation papers filed by the Church of Spiritual Technology seemingly contradict public assurances by church officials that their planned training center here will not be used as a base to espouse the tenets of Scientology. Officials of the Church of Spiritual Technology, an affiliate of the Church of Scientology, tried to allay community concerns Tuesday over their plans to buy a 198-acre complex in the Altadena foothills, which was occupied until last year by the La Vina Hospital. During ...
May 23, 1985
Rally against huge damage award // Scientologists cast protest as defense of all religion — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Peter H. King
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
PORTLAND, Ore. — Duane Wolcott lives at a Christian church here, earning his keep as a custodian. He decribes his principal occupation, however, as "street evangelist," and it is his belief that this week the mysterious hand of God tossed him a terrific career opportunity. The burly 49-year-old could be found at a park by the Willamette River, happily passing out Christian pamphlets to Scientologists attending a free concert by one of their own, jazz musician Chick Corea. "We feel God ...
Nov 24, 1984
Mark and the Sea Orgs — The Weekend Australian
More: link, link
Type: Press
Author(s): Peter Menadue
Source: The Weekend Australian
According to Mark Hanna, missionaries are sometimes sent to Australia from the American Church of Scientology to look over operations and advise on improvements. The advice seems to be effective. Hanna says the Church has about 30,000 Australian members and is in the midst of an "unprecedented boom". During the day, the four floors of its Sydney headquarters at 201 Castlereagh St are occupied by about 60 Scientologists liaising with church offices in other states and training recruits. Off the foyer ...
Oct 28, 1984
Sinking the Master Mariner — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link, reprint in The Weekend Australian
Type: Press
Author(s): John Barnes
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
"Corrupt, sinister and dangerous" were the words used to describe the Church of Scientology in a judgment given by Mr Justice Latey this summer. He also referred to it as "immoral and socially obnoxious". But who controls the Church now? A major Sunday Times Magazine investigation into the activities of the cult in America and Britain has uncovered a disturbing and extraordinary story — the takeover of the organisation by a small band of youthful fanatics following the disappearance of the ...
Tag(s): Advanced Ability CenterAlan WaltersAnnie M. Tidman (aka Annie Broeker aka Annie Logan aka Lisa Mitchell)Apollo (formerly, "Royal Scot Man"; often misspelled "Royal Scotman", "Royal Scotsman")AssetsAuditingAuthor Services, Inc. (ASI) (dba, Galaxy Press) (subsidiary of Church of Spiritual Technology)Battlefield EarthBent CorydonBlackmailBridge Publications, Inc. (BPI)CaliforniaCause Resurgence Rundown aka "Running Program"Church of Spiritual Technology (CST) (dba, L. Ron Hubbard Library)Commodore's Messenger Organization (CMO)Confidential preclear (PC) folderCostDavid MayoDavid MiscavigeDiane VoegedingEdward "Eddie" WaltersFalse imprisonmentFloridaFort Harrison Hotel (also, Flag Land Base) @ 210 South Fort Harrison Avenue Clearwater FL United StatesFraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentationGerald "Gerry" ArmstrongGold Base (also, "INT Base") @ Gilman Hot SpringsGolden Era ProductionsHard sellHeber C. JentzschHoward "Homer" D. SchomerIncomeInternal Revenue Service (IRS)InurementJay HurwitzJohn BarnesJudge Ben KrentzmanJudge Paul G. Breckenridge Jr.Justice Latey, Sir JohnKathleen "Kathy" GorgonKenneth McFarlaneLaurel J. Sullivan (née Watson)LawsuitLee LawrenceLyman D. SpurlockMarc YagerMary Sue (Whipp) HubbardMembershipMichael "Mike" GarsideMichael J. FlynnMission Holders ConferenceNew Era Publications International, ApS (NEPI)Operating Thetan (OT)Patrick D. "Pat" Broeker (aka Mike Mitchell)Registrar (also, to "reg")Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF)Religious Research Foundation (RRF)Religious Technology Center (RTC)Richard N. AznaranRon's Journal 38Ronald "Nibs" Edward DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard, Jr.)Saint Hill Manor @ East Grinstead (UK)Sea Organization (Sea Org, SO)Security check ("sec check")Slave laborSouthern Land Development and Leasing Corporation (SLDLC)Stephen "Steve" MarloweSuppressive person (SP)Tax matterThe Sunday Times (UK)The Weekend AustralianTonja C. BurdenVicki J. (McRae) AznaranWarren L. McShaneWendell ReynoldsWilliam W. "Bill" Franks
Sep 3, 1984
Lawyer says Church of Scientology is waging campaign to 'frame' him — New York Times
More: link, Reprint in Sarasota Herald-Tribune, cs.cmu.edu
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Lindsey
Source: New York Times
LOS ANGELES — Michael J. Flynn, a Boston lawyer, was piloting a light aircraft toward South Bend, Ind., in October 1979 when its engine quit mysteriously at 8,500 feet. After making an emergency landing, he said he found several quarts of water in the fuel tank. Since then, Mr. Flynn, who has led a legal battle against the Church of Scientology, a group that has long been the subject of Government investigations, says he has been followed by as many as ...
Jul 24, 1984
Judge raps 'slave' cult // 'It is immoral, corrupt, sinister and dangerous' — Daily Express (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Maureen Knight
Source: Daily Express (UK)
THE Church of Scientology was branded corrupt, sinister and dangerous by a High Court judge yesterday. Mr Justice Latey roundly condemned the sect, its American leader L. Ron Hubbard and other members or the hierarchy. He said: "Scientology is both immoral and socially obnoxious"—and he slammed Hubbard for a series of false claims. In a Family Division judgment which denied custody of two children to a church member be called Scientology "training for slavery." He said it was already beginning to ...
Jul 24, 1984
The Church of dirty tricks // Lifting the lid on the ruthless Scientology 'slave cult' that brainwashes its recruits — Daily Express (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Maureen Knight
Source: Daily Express (UK)
WHAT THE JUDGE SAID * THE CHURCH USED SEX TO SEDUCE PEOPLE HIGH IN GOVERNMENT * RAN A CAMPAIGN OF LIES AND PERSECUTION AGAINST OPPONENTS * AND USED SINISTER TRAINING METHODS AND IRON DISCIPLINE —– THE "sinister" Church of Scientology was dammed by its own undisputed evidence in yesterday's High Court case. Evidence from memos, letters, directives and bulletins presented to the court by a young mother desperate to win her children back from its clutches. The church, according to Mr ...
Jul 12, 1984
Charges Hubbard diverted funds called "garbage" — Daily News
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Daily News
Charges by church defectors that Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard diverted more than $100 million in church funds to foreign bank accounts was described Wednesday as "garbage" by the sect's president. "I call it hyperspace junk writing," said Heber Jentzsch, president of the Church of Scientology International. The former senior church officials, who have testified about the church's inner workings in Los Angeles court, told the New York Times that Hubbard directed them to establish shell corporations to channel much of ...
Jul 11, 1984
Scientology chief got millions, ex-aides say — New York Times
More: link, nytimes.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Lindsey
Source: New York Times
Former officials of the Church of Scientology say they helped L. Ron Hubbard, the reclusive founder of the cult-like organization, to secretly divert more than $100 million from the church into foreign bank accounts he controlled. The organization, long a subject of investigations in this country, Britain, France, Australia, South Africa, Spain and elsewhere, has maintained that Mr. Hubbard cut his ties to it in the mid-1970's, that he has received only a token consulting fee of $35,000 annually since then ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1984
Scientology E-meter said to offer catharsis — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
It's called the Hubbard Electrometer and is used as a spiritual guide during "auditing," a Church of Scientology practice somewhat similar to Catholic confession. The E-meter, as it is known, is said to be capable of measuring a person's "mental state and change of state" and can pinpoint deeply rooted, previously undetected problems in the brain. The small, simple electronic device, patented by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, may be the most visible of the "religious artifacts" associated with the Clearwater-based ...
Jun 7, 1984
Scientology compared to Catholicism — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
TORONTO—A lawyer representing the Church Scientology likened the 34-year-old sect to the Roman Catholic Church during hearing Wednesday in Ontario Supreme Court. Arguing that the Ontario Provincial Police had no right to seize Scientology files during a raid on the sect's Toronto mission last year, Clayton Ruby told the court that Scientology should be given the same respect and protection afforded established religions. "Should a new church be (treated differently) because its doctrines are not as well-known?" Ruby asked Justice John ...
Jun 2, 1984
Scientology: 'auditing' the 'engram' — Seattle Post-Intelligencer
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John McCoy
Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The basic premise of the Church of Scientology is that humans can realize their full potential only if they clear away negative memories. The means of doing so were presented by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard in the best-selling book "Dianencs," which he wrote in 1950. Hubbard argued that by a process of counseling ("auditing"), negative memories ("engrams") could be erased. Auditing involves the use of an E-meter, a sort of lie detector on which, the subject holds two tin ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.