Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “I. F. Magazine”

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anti-psychiatry • auditing • church of scientology international (csi) • cost • cult awareness network (can) (earlier form, citizen's freedom foundation) • david miscavige • disconnection • e-meter • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • freedom (scientology magazine) • heber c. jentzsch • internal revenue service (irs) • john travolta • lawsuit • medical claims • membership • operation snow white • private investigator(s) • scientology: the thriving cult of greed and power (article) • sea organization (sea org, so) • suppressive person (sp) • time magazine • tax matter • xenu (operating thetan level 3, ot 3, wall of fire)
184 matching items found.
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Dec 6, 1978
Ex-agent alleges fraud in F.B.I.; says many informers are bogus — New York Times
Nov 22, 1978
Bounty hunting is back — Dearborn Press & Guide (Michigan)
Aug 29, 1978
Church claims U.S. campaign of harassment // Scientologists advance charge as rationale for aggressive policies — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Gillette, Robert Rawitch
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Church of Scientology contends that for more than 20 years it has been the target of a systematic campaign by the United States government, together with "vested-interest pressure groups" such as the medical professions, to "suppress the church's spiritual practice and expansion." The church advances this accusation as the fundamental rationale for its aggressive policies of defense-by-attack against individual critics, private groups and government agencies perceived as "harassing" Scientology. Church spokesmen, moreover, expand upon the allegation of systematic persecution to ...
Aug 19, 1978
Scientologists to have first ACT service — Canberra Times (Australia)
Type: Press
Author(s): Peter Quiddington
Source: Canberra Times (Australia)
The Church of Scientology, the invention of science fiction writer Ron Hubbard which has caused an unholy uproar around the world in the past, will hold a Canberra inaugural service at Red Hill tomorrow. The Church, established in 1953 by Mr Hubbard after his book 'Dienetics', published in 1950, attracted world-wide interest in the principles of Scientology. More than five million people in 54 countries are understood to have gone through the Scientology processing, a full course of which can cost ...
Item contributed by: Zhent (Anonymous)
Aug 14, 1978
Up Front: Federal prosecutors unveil the astonishing intrigues of the Scientology church — People magazine
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Cheryl McCall
Source: People magazine
Since its founding by a science fiction writer named L. Ron Hubbard in 1954, Scientology has been among the growth stocks on the self-help market: a quasireligious, quasiscientific cult that has attracted three million U.S. followers (some highly touted celebrities among them) and estimated annual revenues in the hundreds of millions, much of it tax-exempt. Until recently Scientology's only certifiable vice was eccentricity, but within a week a federal grand jury in Washington is expected to hand down a bulging sheaf ...
Jul 25, 1977
Scientology: Parry and Thrust — TIME Magazine
Type: Press
Source: TIME Magazine
The Church of Scientology, founded 23 years ago by a science-fiction writer, does not believe in turning the other cheek. In a key church exercise called ''auditing," members are taught, for a handsome fee, to confront long-forgotten traumas—sometimes even from previous incarnations—and then to scourge these so-called "engrams" that have been troubling their subconscious. The church is equally assertive toward outside critics. Scientologists have filed scores of lawsuits against skeptical journalists, dissident former members and Government agencies, which have long suspected ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Apr 5, 1976
A Sci-Fi Faith — TIME Magazine
Type: Press
Source: TIME Magazine
The mystery began to unfold last fall in sleepy, sun-drenched Clearwater, Fla. The Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp. decided to buy the 270-room Fort Harrison Hotel, a downtown landmark, and a nearby bank building. Southern Land stated that the hotel would stay open, but another spokesman announced that it would become a center for the United Churches of Florida, a new ecumenical outfit that soon won endorsement from twelve local clergymen. When 200 tight-lipped strangers moved into the hotel, rumors ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 23, 1973
'Freedom' proves popular; national tour announced — Chronicle (Washington)
Jul 7, 1973
'The snake pit' and '1984'... Here and now? — Seattle Post-Intelligencer
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Earl Hansen
Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
"The weird, offbeat types of religious sects are getting far too much attention," a Lutheran minister bemoaned. "Sensational-type groups don't deserve the publicity," a Methodist added. And their outcry is common, even though much of the publicity might be harsh and critical. Such as this column's reporting of the Church of Scientology's local protest activities in 1971 against the federal offices here of the Food and Drug Administration. Cited were angry, shouting youths, including girls, dressed in clerics. But since then, ...
Apr 28, 1973
Religion on the march // Scientology's new reverence — Nation Review (Australia)
Type: Press
Author(s): John May
Source: Nation Review (Australia)
ONE OF the federal Labor government's many decisions in the past four months — recognition of scientology as a religion — has passed with little, if any, coverage by the Australian press. However, the move has been more than popular with the nation's 3000 active scientologists and has received rave reviews in the movement's press, both here and overseas. The government's proclamation, gazetted on february 15, recognised as celebrants of marriage fiftyfive religious bodies, including the Church of the New Faith ...
Item contributed by: Zhent (Anonymous)
Oct 26, 1972
Books / Inside Scientology — Rolling Stone
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): William S. Burroughs
Source: Rolling Stone
[Picture / Caption: Burroughs using a Scientology E-Meter: "All this time I felt my self-respect slipping away from me and finally completely gone . . . officially removed. . . "] Inside Scientology by Robert Kaufman Olympia Press. 279 pp. BY WILLIAM BURROUGHS The upper levels of Scientology processing are classified as "confidential," which means that only those who have completed the lower grades, passed security checks, and paid the large fees in advance are allowed to see and run this ...
May 22, 1972
Scientology fights back — The Nation
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Clay Steinman
Source: The Nation
Mr. Steinman is a free-lance writer living in New York. Like all true believers, the members of the young Church of Scientology (or Dianetics as it is sometimes known) believe they have found the answers. A visit to their New York headquarters in the Hotel Martinique shows that Scientology has at least put smiles on a few faces and seems to have solved many of the existential problems of the members who work and study there. According to the recent U. ...
Mar 1, 1972
Scientology wins in court — Fate Magazine
Type: Press
Author(s): Richard E. Saunders
Source: Fate Magazine
AFTER ALMOST 10 years of what only can be called harassment by the Food and Drug Administration the Founding Church of Scientology in Washington, D. C., has emerged from the courts victorious.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 08 The British and Australian Orgs — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 09 Attacking the Attackers — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 10 The Suppressives — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 14 Scientology -- Business or Religion? — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 15 Is Scientology Political? — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 16 Scientology Versus Medicine — Tower Publications, Inc.
Jan 1, 1971
The Scandal of Scientology - 18 The E-Meter — Tower Publications, Inc.
Mar 6, 1970
Burroughs on Scientology (Incomplete) — Los Angeles Free Press
Mar 1, 1970
I, William Burroughs, challenge you, L. Ron Hubbard — Mayfair (magazine)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): William S. Burroughs
Source: Mayfair (magazine)
'You claim Scientology is the universal road to freedom. Well I've taken your course and I say: prove it to all of us. Come out country simple and prove it' In view of the fact that my articles and statements on Scientology may have influenced young people to associate themselves with the so-called Church of Scientology, I feel an obligation to make my present views on the subject quite clear. 'Some of the techniques are highly valuable and warrant further study ...
Dec 1, 1969
The Tragi-Farce of Scientology — Queen (magazine)
Type: Press
Author(s): Paulette Cooper
Source: Queen (magazine)
If you think you have problems with Scientology in England, you should see what's happening in the States. Here, they pass out their leaflets on the street corners of some of the most pukka neighbourhoods, urging innocent bystanders to try out Scientology. Those who have accepted the invitation have found themselves in one of their many dingy headquarters, listening to a dull lecture on Scientology, followed by a film of equal merit on its leader, L. Ron Hubbard. Those who didn't ...
Aug 3, 1969
Religion or business? // Practices of Scientology being investigated again — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link, pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Type: Press
Author(s): John Dart
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
RELIGION OR BUSINESS? Practices of Scientology Being Investigated Again By John Dart Times Religion Writer [Picture / Caption: YOUNG INITIATES — The Rev. Robert Bobo talks with two children who are taking Scientology courses. The photo on the wall is of the founder of the worldwide group, L. Ron Hubbard.] The mimeographed notice looked more like a secret police communique than a church message. It informed "those concerned" that a certain 20-year-old girl "is hereby declared a Suppressive Person and assigned ...
Jun 1, 1969
The Dangerous New Cult of Scientology — Parents' Magazine
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Arlene Eisenberg, Howard Eisenberg
Source: Parents' Magazine
When ministers of the Founding Church of Scientology told a Falls Church, Virginia couple that could teach the couple's defective son to talk and raise his IQ at same time, the man and wife, understandably in search of a miracle, willingly paid—in advance—the sum of $3,000 as a "contribution for spiritual guidance." The husband cashed a life insurance policy, sold some bonds, added the proceeds of a small bequest and "scraped around in various places." And then his son Paul's "processing" ...
Dec 1, 1968
SCIENTOLOGY – Menace to Mental health — Today's Health
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ralph Lee Smith
Source: Today's Health
Couched in pseudoscientific terms and rites, this dangerous cult claims to help mentally or emotionally disturbed persons—for sizable fees. Scientology has grown into a very profitable worldwide enterprise . . . and a serious threat to health. [Picture / Caption: L. Ronald Hubbard, Scientology's founder.] [Picture / Caption: Bust of Hubbard flanks "altar" in Scientology "church" near London. Among his accomplishments, Hubbard claims to have been dead and recovered, to have visited Venus and heaven.] LAST SUMMER in New York City, ...
Nov 15, 1968
Scientology: A growing cult reaches dangerously into the mind — Life Magazine
More: blog.modernmechanix.com, lermanet.com
Oct 13, 1968
Youthful inventor thinks on his hands — Houston Post
Aug 23, 1968
Meddling with Minds — TIME Magazine
Type: Press
Source: TIME Magazine
Not many modern religions can claim the distinction of being denounced by a major European government as "socially harmful . . . a potential menace to the personality" and "a serious danger to health." Yet those were the words chosen by Britain's Health Minister Kenneth Robinson when he took the floor of the Commons last month to censure the little-known and less understood Church of Scientology. Dreamed up by L. Ron Hubbard, a onetime science-fiction writer, Scientology originally surfaced as "Dianetics," ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Aug 1, 1968
Britain curbs activities of cult of Scientologists // Refuses to admit Americans known to be followers of the semireligious group — New York Times
More: link, select.nytimes.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Anthony Lewis
Source: New York Times
LONDON, July 31—On successive days this week groups of Americans arriving in Britain have been turned back because they are followers of a semi-religious cult known as scientology. The ban on scientologists, as they call themselves, was imposed by the British Government after a study. The Minister of Health, Kenneth Robinson, said in the House of Commons that he was satisfied that "scientology is socially harmful." "Its authoritarian principles and practices are a potential menace to the personality and well-being of ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.