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Scientology library: “Infiltration”

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canada • church of scientology of toronto • dead agenting (black pr, smear campaign) • fair game • federal bureau of investigation (fbi) • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • front groups • gabriel "gabe" cazares • harassment • infiltration • internal revenue service (irs) • judge charles r. richey • lawsuit • legal • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • medical claims • membership • narconon (aka scientology drug rehab) • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • ontario provincial police (opp) • operation snow white • paulette cooper • royal canadian mounted police (rcmp) • tax matter • theft
Reference materials Infiltration
224 matching items found.
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Page of 8: ⇑ Latest         
Sep 9, 1999
Files destroyed in Scientology case — The Guardian (UK)
Sep 9, 1999
Loss of Scientology files studied — New York Times
May 9, 1999
Is Scientology above the law? — France 2
Mar 29, 1999
Abroad: Critics public and private keep pressure on Scientology — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Lucy Morgan
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Scientology leaders say they want peace. They say they want to stay out of court. But with both foes at home and foes abroad, that goal may be elusive. The spiritual home of the Church of Scientology is in Clearwater, but for many years now its leaders have had worldwide ambitions. But as disciples have carried L. Ron Hubbard's teachings away from America's shore, the reception has been almost universally chilly at best – and at times openly hostile. At one ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 3 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
pictures of FBI raid on Scn churches; newspaper article titled, “Secret probe sparks raid on Scientology” VO: On July 7, 1977, 134 FBI agents stormed into Scientology centers in Washington and Los Angeles. Washington Post newspaper article titled, “Scientologists Kept Files on ‘Enemies’ ROBERT VAUGHN YOUNG (voice of): We hit the front page of every newspaper in the country at that time. footage of Scn press conference; copy of “Alaska Mental Health Act”; newspaper article titled, “Woman Sees ‘Political Siberia’ In ...
Dec 14, 1998
Investigative Reports: Inside Scientology [Part 8 of 10] — Arts and Entertainment Channel
Type: TV
Source: Arts and Entertainment Channel
Clearwater picket 1997–Xenu picketing with sign saying “L. Ron Hubbard: Psychotic CON MAN”, other picketers with signs saying “www.scientology-kills.net” “Xenu Crossing (inside a yellow sign on picket sign)”; Deana Holmes with sign saying “Did Standard Tech kill Lisa?”; lecture at Scientology church VO: While church administration is busy dealing with a steady stream of conflict, individual Scientologists are out among the people, spreading Hubbard’s word at every opportunity. MIKE RINDER: Well, you know, the aims of Scientology are a civilization without ...
Sep 3, 1998
Who wins when rights conflict? — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Mark Trahant
Source: Seattle Times
The American West, like this country itself, was a refuge for religious movements. The Mormons moved to Utah - or Zion as they preferred to call it - because of its isolation from the rest of the country. But it didn't quite work out as expected. The federal government in 1857 insisted that the Mormons end the practice of polygamy - and sent a military force to occupy Utah and convert the territory and its theocracy into a secular state. The ...
Jan 19, 1998
Scientology seeks tax-receipt status — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Dec 1, 1997
Religion's search for a home base — New York Times
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Douglas Frantz
Source: New York Times
CLEARWATER, Fla. — In 1975, L. Ron Hubbard, the flamboyant founder of the Church of Scientology, was intent on finding a home base for his religion, which had come under criticism in several countries. The result was Operation Goldmine. Late that year, a dummy corporation paid $2.3 million in cash to buy the Fort Harrison Hotel, a historic building that was the symbolic heart of downtown Clearwater. The buyer was identified as the United Churches of Florida, an unknown organization. A ...
Jul 29, 1997
Hubbard texts approved for school use // Education: A state panel has given a preliminary OK to five books based on the Scientology founder's teaching philosophy — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Duke Helfand
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The state education department has given preliminary approval to statewide use of school textbooks inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, which already are at the center of a controversy in Los Angeles schools. Five books based on Hubbard's education ideas are expected to be placed on a list of supplementary texts that schools across the state can purchase–possibly as soon as September, an education official said Monday. "There's no religion mentioned in those books," said Anna Emery of the state ...
Jul 27, 1997
Special Report: Hubbard Teachings in Public Classrooms — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: articles.latimes.com, link
Type: Press
Author(s): Duke Helfand
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
As the Los Angeles Board of Education grapples with whether to approve a new charter school that would feature the teaching methods of L. Ron Hubbard, the late founder of the Church of Scientology, a handful of district teachers say they have been using those techniques for years and keep copies of Hubbard's works in their classrooms. The controversy over the use of Hubbard's methods–known as Applied Scholastics–has prompted district officials to undertake a review of policies on religion in public ...
Jun 7, 1997
Germany will place Scientology under nationwide surveillance — New York Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Alan Cowell
Source: New York Times
BONN, June 6 — The German authorities decided today to place the Scientology movement under nationwide surveillance for one year, their sharpest action yet in a long battle against a group they say is bent on undermining their democratic society. The decision, which critics called authoritarian and impractical, means that Scientologists' mail may be intercepted, their phones tapped and their offices infiltrated by undercover agents posing as adherents. The organization said it would contest the decision in court. By making public ...
Jun 1, 1997
Did Scientology strike back? — The American Lawyer
Type: Press
Author(s): Susan Hansen
Source: The American Lawyer
When the end finally came for the old Cult Awareness Network, it happened fast. Cynthia Kisser, CAN's executive director, struggled to stay calm as she sat in federal bankruptcy court in Chicago late last October waiting for the auction to begin. Kisser, who had spent the past nine years leading CAN's efforts to inform the public about dangerous cults, had hoped that she wouldn't have to pay much for her group's assets that day. Nor did she want much, she claims ...
Mar 30, 1997
The true story of a false prophet — Mail on Sunday (UK)
Feb 6, 1997
Germany versus Scientology — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Jan 17, 1997
'Mission' a German hit despite boycott — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Judy Brennan, Mary Williams Walsh
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Movies: The success of the film, targeted by conservatives because it stars Scientologist Tom Cruise, eases studio fears about releasing other films featuring members of the movement. Despite the much-publicized boycott in Germany of "Mission: Impossible" because its star, Tom Cruise, is a Scientologist, the film grossed about $24 million, considered a huge success for the important German market by Hollywood studios, and ranked eighth in Germany for 1996. The results could help assuage the Hollywood studios that are preparing for ...
Nov 28, 1996
The Big Story: The S-Files — ITV
More: transcript, partial transcript
Type: TV
Author(s): Dermot Murnaghan
Source: ITV
Title "The S Files" [S as in Scientology Logo] [Presenter Dermot Murnaghan (DM henceforth) no relation to any other DM] Tonight we're going to expose serious financial crime in one of the Scientology cult's most successful operations in Britain. We show how they cooked the books, made false statements to obtain bank loans, and changed invoices to fiddle their VAT. [Extract from "Trust" ad] This advert for the Church of Scientology was recently shown on cable TV. It was a major ...
Sep 1, 1996
Germany finds Scientology to have menacing mission — Indianapolis Star (Indiana)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Barbara Demick
Source: Indianapolis Star (Indiana)
Lawmakers are looking at barring its members from teaching, police work, other government jobs. HAMBURG, Germany — As the politicians see it, Germany, is being threatened by an evil plot to infiltrate business and government. "A giant octopus . . . that will stop at nothing in its desire to spread its blind ideology" is how Labor Secretary Norbert Blum has described the plot against Germany. Claudia Nolte, another member of Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Cabinet, warns, "They aim at world domination ...
Jan 11, 1996
German official calls for security surveillance of Scientologists — New York Times
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Alan Cowell
Source: New York Times
BONN, Jan. 10 — In the long-running duel between the German authorities and the Church of Scientology, a senior Government official urged today that it be placed under surveillance by the same internal security agency that tracks terrorists and political extremists. The official, Claudia Nolte, the Minister for Family Policy, described the church as "one of the most aggressive groups in our society" and said she would "oppose the Scientology organization with all the means at my disposal." The Church of ...
Mar 22, 1995
In whose hands? / How Allstate applied Scientology methods to train its managers — Wall Street Journal
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Rochelle Sharpe
Source: Wall Street Journal
Two years ago, an Allstate agent stood up at Sears's annual meeting to ask what then seemed a bizarre question. "To what extent," he inquired, "are the teachings of L. Ron Hubbard's Church of Scientology present today in Allstate and in Sears?" Edward Brennan, chairman of Sears, Roebuck & Co., and Wayne Hedien, then-chairman of Sears's Allstate Insurance Co. unit, both appeared bewildered. Mr. Brennan said he had no knowledge of any relationship at all. Mr. Hedien said he didn't even ...
Dec 1, 1994
Litigation noir // Ford Greene thought he knew all about hardball litigation. Then he sued the Church of Scientology. — California Lawyer
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Steven Pressman
Source: California Lawyer
It was a strange way to describe an aspect of a theology. But L. Ron Hubbard, the highly successful science-fiction writer who founded the Church of Scientology in the 1950s, had little tolerance for those who challenged his beliefs. And so it was, at one time, that Scientology scripture came to include an unusual litigation clause: "The only way to defend anything is to attack, and if you ever forget that, then you will lose every battle you are ever engaged ...
Oct 13, 1994
Officials in Germany denounces sect as a menace to democracy — New York Times
Oct 28, 1993
Atkinson-Baker & Associates, Inc. v. James G. Kolts
More: holysmoke.org
Type: Document
Atkinson-baker & Associates, Inc., Plaintiff-appellant, v. James G. Kolts, in His Official Capacity, Defendant-appellee United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. - 7 F.3d 1452 Submitted Oct. 20, 1993*.Decided Oct. 28, 1993 —– Michael T. Stoller, Besbris, Hollis & Stoller, Los Angeles, CA, for plaintiff-appellant. Terree A. Bowers, U.S. Atty., Leon W. Weidman, George H. Wu, Asst. U.S. Attys., Los Angeles, CA, for defendant-appellee. Appeal from the United States District Court for the Central District of California. Before: BEEZER, KOZINSKI, and ...
Jun 14, 1993
Scientology in the schools — Newsweek
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Kenneth L. Woodward, Charles Fleming
Source: Newsweek
Is L. Ron Hubbard's morals text harmless? When Carol Burgeson received a copy of "The Way to Happiness" in the mail 18 months ago, she read it through and decided it was the perfect non-religious vehicle for teaching moral values to her senior students at Thornton Township High School in Harvey, Ill. So Burgeson ordered more free copies of the book by L. Ron Hubbard and used them to stimulate discussions in her classes. "It seemed so harmless," she says. "Brush ...
Sep 12, 1992
Church of Scientology fined $250,000 for espionage — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Sep 12, 1992
Scientology fined $250,000 for spying on police — Toronto Star (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bob Brent, Wendy Darroch
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
The Toronto branch of the Church of Scientology has been fined $250,000 for spying on police and the government during the mid- 1970s. But despite almost a decade of court battles since the largest police raid in Ontario history in 1983, church leaders say they're not about to give up. The church's odyssey through the courts has spawned a legacy of ground-breaking legal decisions interpreting the ability of the state to prosecute the non-profit church. Along the way, the founder of ...
Jun 27, 1992
Church of Scientology found guilty — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas Claridge
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
An Ontario prosecution sparked by police raids in California during the 1970s has led to the conviction of the Church of Scientology of Toronto and three of its members on breach-of-trust charges. A jury that deliberated for two days after a two-month trial also acquitted the Toronto organization of three charges and found two other members not guilty. Despite the verdicts, which will lead to a sentencing hearing Aug. 12 and 13, the legal battle over espionage activities by Scientologists for ...
Jun 26, 1992
Scientology chapter, 3 members convicted — Toronto Star (Canada)
Type: Press
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
The Toronto chapter of the Church of Scientology and three of its members were found guilty last night of breach of trust. Earlier yesterday, the church and five members were acquitted on charges of theft. Both charges stem from a series of alleged dirty tricks conducted by the church's covert intelligence-gathering body, the Guardian Office Worldwide, between 1974 and 1976. The verdicts were delivered last night by a 12-member jury which had deliberated for two days. The trial began April 23. ...
Jun 26, 1992
Scientology church convicted on 2 counts — Globe and Mail (Canada)
Type: Press
Author(s): Thomas Claridge
Source: Globe and Mail (Canada)
An Ontario Court jury last night found the Church of Scientology of Toronto and three of its members guilty of breach-of-trust charges stemming from infiltration of the Ontario government and three police forces in the 1970s. The jury found the organization guilty on two counts and not guilty on three others, and acquitted two individuals. Mr. Justice James Southey of the court's General Division, set aside Aug. 12 and 13 for sentencing. The criminal charges followed a raid on the Toronto ...
Jun 19, 1992
Toronto's Scientologists unaware of dirty tricks, defence lawyer says — Toronto Star (Canada)
Type: Press
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
Referring to the Church of Scientology as "this little church," defence lawyer Clayton Ruby yesterday said its Toronto members were "regular parishioners" unaware of any crimes that were committed. In his closing address in the breach-of-trust trial of Scientology's Toronto branch, Ruby urged the 12-person jury to judge Scientology as they would their own church. Citing recent cases of sexual abuse involving priests in the Catholic church, Ruby said: "The (Catholic) church wasn't prosecuted, only individuals. Never has a jury been ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.