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Scientology library: “L. Ron Hubbard's credentials”

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apollo (formerly, "royal scot man"; often misspelled "royal scotman", "royal scotsman") • auditing • australia • bare-faced messiah: the true story of l. ron hubbard (book) • cost • e-meter • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • gerald "gerry" armstrong • internal revenue service (irs) • judge paul g. breckenridge jr. • l. ron hubbard • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • medical claims • membership • michael j. flynn • operation snow white • ronald "nibs" edward dewolf (l. ron hubbard, jr.) • russell miller • sea organization (sea org, so) • supernatural abilities (aka ot powers) • suppressive person (sp) • united kingdom (uk)
Reference materials L. Ron Hubbard's credentials
279 matching items found.
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May 24, 1991
The Scientology of selling // The Hubbard is bare — L.A. Weekly (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ralph Rugoff
Source: L.A. Weekly (California)
I ARRIVED FOR MY APPOINTMENT AT THE L. RON Hubbard Life Exhibition Hall a few minutes early. Unlike in other commemorative mausoleums, such as the Nixon Library and Birthplace, you're not allowed to walk around the Hubbard by yourself. Instead, you must sign up for an hour-and-a-half guided tour. Possibly they don't trust the unassisted viewer to fully reap the museum's rewards, though it might also be a matter of security. The presence of a young guard dressed in the Church ...
May 11, 1991
Cult busters — The Age (Australia)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Jacqui MacDonald
Source: The Age (Australia)
Two American cult-busters recently flew to Australia to try to reclaim a young man from Scientology. JACQUI MACDONALD watched as they tried to unlock his mind, hour by hour, inch by inch. The names of the family and the cult-busters have been changed. FOR TWO days Peter Nolan has rehearsed how to greet his son. Peter and his wife Mary have planned how they will open the flywire front door and smile at the son they have not seen for several ...
Apr 14, 1991
More hokum from guru Hubbard — Daily Yomiuri (Japan)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Mark Wilkinson
Source: Daily Yomiuri (Japan)
CLEAR BODY, CLEAR MIND: The Effective Purification Program, by L. Ron Hubbard; Bridge Publications; 306 pages. After years of polluting your body, there's hope: L. Ron Hubbard's Clear Body Clear Mind. It gives insights into the horrible toxins in all of us and provides home remedies for flushing our bodies. And if you're an utter rube, you may find comfort in the evangelical, condescending tone of this astounding example of self-promotion. Claiming to have discovered the presence of impurities in our ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 1: The Mind Behind the Religion — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
It was a triumph of galactic proportions: Science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard had discarded the body that bound him to the physical universe and was off to the next phase of his spiritual exploration — "on a planet a galaxy away." "Hip, hip, hurray!" thousands of Scientologists thundered inside the Hollywood Palladium, where they had just been told of this remarkable feat. "Hip, hip, hurray! Hip, hip, hurray!" they continued to chant, gazing at a large photograph of Hubbard, creator ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 2: Creating the Mystique — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Hubbard's image was crafted of truth, distorted by myth. To his followers, L. Ron Hubbard was bigger than life. But it was an image largely of his own making. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge put it bluntly while presiding over a Church of Scientology lawsuit in 1984. Scientology's founder, he said, was "virtually a pathological liar" about his past. Hubbard was an intelligent and well-read man, with diverse interests, experience and expertise. But that apparently was not enough to satisfy ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 3: Life With L. Ron Hubbard — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Aides indulged his eccentricities and egotism. L. Ron Hubbard enjoyed being pampered. He surrounded himself with teen-age followers, whom he indoctrinated, treated like servants and cherished as though they were his own children. He called them the "Commodore's messengers." " 'Messenger!' " he would boom in the morning. "And we'd pull him out of bed," one recalled. The youngsters, whose parents belonged to Hubbard's Church of Scientology, would lay out his clothes, run his shower and help him dress. He taught ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Staking a Claim to Blood Brotherhood — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: scs.cmu.edu
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
As L. Ron Hubbard told it, he was 4 years old when a medicine man named "Old Tom" made him a "blood brother" of the Blackfeet Indians of Montana, providing the inspiration for the Scientology founder's first novel, "Buckskin Brigades." But one expert on the tribe doesn't buy Hubbard's account. Historian Hugh Dempsey is associate director of the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Canada. He has extensively researched the tribe, of which his wife is a member. He said that blood brothers ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Mar 12, 1990
Who is the owner of the written word? — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bob Sipchen
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Imagine that a biographer is rummaging through an old trunk. He discovers a previously unseen letter from George Washington to Martha. He unfolds the brittle pages. "Martha, I must tell you, I was fibbing when I said, 'I cannot tell a lie.' " When that hypothetical biography is published, will you, the book buyer, get to read the Founding Father's confession? Hard to say. Last month the Supreme Court refused to review an appeals court ruling that copyright law strictly limits ...
Feb 21, 1990
Curbs stand on unpublished writings — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Feb 21, 1990
Justices permit strict curbs on use of unpublished writing — Washington Post
Aug 28, 1989
Special Report // Hubbard: Prophet or snake-oil salesman? — Daily Tribune (Oakland County, Michigan)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Julie Edgar
Source: Daily Tribune (Oakland County, Michigan)
Was Lafayette Ron Hubbard, founder of Dianetics and the inspiration behind the Church of Scientology, a profoundly gifted man destined for sainthood? Or was he a fraud who routinely lied about his accomplishments in order to bilk millions from his followers? Even after his death in 1986 at the age of 75, Hubbard's writings on Scientology — often slightly updated versions of earlier "discoveries" — continue to be published and some two million followers remain faithful. The media, too, continues to ...
Aug 2, 1989
Ex-Scientologist risks jail to speak against church — Orlando Sentinel
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Claire Dezern
Source: Orlando Sentinel
TAMPA — You shouldn't be reading this story. The tale of Margery Wakefield vs. the Church of Scientology is supposed to be a secret. Church officials say so. So does a federal judge. In fact, Wakefield could go to jail for talking about the 12 years she spent as a member of the cult, which has its spiritual headquarters in Clearwater. Wakefield, 41, is talking anyway, braving the threats of Scientology lawyers and testing the patience of a U.S. district judge. ...
Jun 30, 1989
Collaboration with Hubbard led Winter to 'Earth' — Daily News
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bruce Britt
Source: Daily News
Initially labeled a blues-rock singer, Edgar Winter went on to record popular hard-rock albums like "Frankenstein," "They Only Come Out at Night" and "Shock Treatment" during the 1970s. Winter has been out of the spotlight lately, but he has kept busy touring with former Doobie, Brothers singer Michael McDonald as well as singer-songwriter Leon Russell. He also performed on David Lee Roth's rendition of Winter's 1974 hit "Easy Street." Recently Winter returned to the recording studio to record in album titled ...
Apr 27, 1989
Narconon-Chilocco drug treatment plant may be part of notorious religious cult — Newkirk Herald Journal (Oklahoma)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Lobsinger
Source: Newkirk Herald Journal (Oklahoma)
NEWKIRK, OK – A proposed drug treatment and rehabilitation center which could be in operation on Indian land at the former Chilocco Indian School north of Newkirk by June 15th may be part of a notorious religious cult. Narconon was approved for a 75-bed facility by the State Health Planning Commission in January of this year as part of The Chilocco Development Authority. The projected cost is $400,000 for renovation and the five Indian tribes involved are projected to receive $16,000,000 ...
Tag(s): All God' s Children (book)Anderson Report (Australia)Arthur J. MarenAssociation for Better Living and Education (ABLE) (formerly, "Social Coordination" or SOCO)AuditingAustraliaBetsy CarterBlackmailCarroll StonerClearwater Sun (Florida)ConvictionCostDianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health (book)DisconnectionE-MeterEdna FultonEngramFair gameFood and Drug Administration (FDA)Fort Harrison Hotel (also, Flag Land Base) @ 210 South Fort Harrison Avenue Clearwater FL United StatesFranceFraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentationGabriel "Gabe" CazaresGarry BilgerGene ChillHeber C. JentzschJo Anne ParkeJohn BrodieJohn DuffJohn McMasterJudge Jose Maria Vazquez HonrubiaJulie Christofferson TitchbourneL. Ron Hubbard's credentialsLawsuitLife MagazineLos Angeles Times (California)Martin KasindorfMedical claimsMembershipMichael ReeseNarconon (aka Scientology drug rehab)Narconon Chilocco New Life CenterNarconon InternationalNewkirk Herald Journal (Oklahoma)NewsweekOklahomaOperating Thetan (OT)Orange County RegisterOvert, withholdPurification Rundown ("Purif")Religious Technology Center (RTC)Rena WeinbergRichard OfsheRobert W. LobsingerRonald "Nibs" Edward DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard, Jr.)San Diego Union-TribuneScientology's "Clear" stateSilencing criticism, censorshipSouthern Land Development and Leasing Corporation (SLDLC)SpainSt. Petersburg Times (Florida)Supernatural abilities (aka OT powers)Suppressive person (SP)TIME MagazineUnited Churches of FloridaUnited Kingdom (UK)William C. BenitezWilliam Menninger
Aug 24, 1988
Letters // Ignoring achievements of L. Ron Hubbard — Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Virginia)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Virginia)
To the Editor: Modern journalism seems to have developed a nearly terminal case of "tunnel vision" — only believing things that are "controversial," "horrifying," "absurd" or "sexy." Things which conflict with this journalistic "formula" are either ignored or ridiculed. Such is the sad fate of staff writer Patrick Lackey's June 26 review of a book ostensibly concerning the late American author and founder of the Scientology religion, L. Ron Hubbard (Bare-Faced Messiah, by Russell Miller). The book itself also suffered this ...
Aug 11, 1988
On the Ron — NY Daily News (New York)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Anne L. Adams
Source: NY Daily News (New York)
A brutal bio of L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology, will get to see the light. Again. The News' Alex Michellini reports that New Era Publications, a Danish corporation related to the church, tried to enjoin the distribution of Russel Miller's "Bare-Faced: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard." New Era charged that the book and its publisher, Henry Holt & Co. infringed on certain copyrighted material. Maybe it does, just a little, said Federal Judge Pierre Leval. ...
Jun 26, 1988
Hubbard: A writer who founded a religion — Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Virginia)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Patrick K. Lackey
Source: Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Virginia)
You've probably seen television commercials for the book "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health," by L. Ron Hubbard. They show a volcano erupting. Ten million copies of the book have been sold since a large portion of it appeared in the April 1950 issue of the pulp publication "Astounding Science Fiction." It remains on the best-seller lists even today. Yuppies are said to love it. Hubbard, who died in 1986 at age 74, was already one of the best-selling science ...
Jun 1, 1988
Court reverses fair use ruling on Hubbard bio — Publisher's Weekly
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Publisher's Weekly
Latest in a line of rulings turning on fair use, a U.S. Appeals Court has overturned a lower court's injunction that prevented publication of a critical biography of L. Ron Hubbard as long as it contained copyrighted material from the published writings of the late founder of Scientology. New Era Publications, which owns Hubbard's copyrights, had won the injunction earlier this year when the district court ruled that the use of 103 passages taken from 43 published works by Hubbard was ...
May 21, 1988
Court halts distribution of Hubbard biography — New York Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Edwin McDowell
Source: New York Times
A Federal judge has issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting Henry Holt & Company from distributing additional copies of a biography highly critical of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the Church of Scientology. Some 12,500 copies of the book, Bare-Faced Messiah by Russell Miller, were shipped to bookstores on April 27. The court order, handed down yesterday in Manhattan by Judge Pierre N. Leval of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, affects the 10,000 ...
Jan 30, 1988
Hubbard's fantasy cruises on: Bare-Faced Messiah, by Russell Miller — The Age (Australia)
Jan 16, 1988
Scientology: the other side — The Weekend Australian
Dec 5, 1987
Novel preachings of the science-fiction Messiah — The Advertiser (Australia)
Dec 2, 1987
Bid to ban book said 'harassment' by Scientologists — Toronto Star (Canada)
Type: Press
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
L. Ron Hubbard was portrayed yesterday in court as a devious cult leader who believed he'd gone to heaven — twice — and was ruthless in his treatment of those perceived as enemies of the church he founded. Hubbard, who died last year, advised his followers to use the courts to "harass and discourage" critics, lawyers for Key Porter Books argued in Federal Court. They said a court bid to stop publication of a biography of Hubbard is a thinly disguised ...
Nov 22, 1987
Whoring after strange gods — The Observer (London, UK)
Nov 8, 1987
Messiah at the Manor [excerpt from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"] — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
Scientology grew out of the ashes of L Ron Hubbard's 'new science' of Dianetics, which enjoyed a brief vogue in the America of the 1950s then faded to bring its founder close to bankruptcy. In this second extract from the book the Church of Scientology tried to ban, RUSSELL MILLER describes the bizarre, science-fiction basis of the new, highly profitable religion and Hubbard's self-appointed mission to 'save the world' —– L RON HUBBARD had often said: "If a man really wanted ...
Nov 8, 1987
Rhodesian takeover bid [excerpt from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"] — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
ON April 7, 1966, the CIA headquarters in the United States received a cable from an agent in Rhodesia: "Request traces of L Ron Hubbard, US citizen recently arrived." The reply confirmed that headquarters files contained no derogatory information about the subject, but a memo was attached giving excerpts from press reports. It concluded: "Individuals who have been connected with the organisations headed by Hubbard or who have had contact with him and the organisations, have indicated that Hubbard is a ...
Nov 1, 1987
Hubbard: bare-faced messiah — The Sunday Times (UK)
Oct 30, 1987
Literary review // A profit without honor — Private Eye (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Private Eye (UK)
Bare-Faced Messiah Russell Miller ''Michael Joseph, £2.95 (copies available from Church of Scientology, Tottenham Court Road) CULTS require their members to believe three impossible things before breakfast. But a successful cult's adherents can't afford breakfast because they've given all their money to the guru. And, of all the gurus in the world, none was as opportunistic, mendacious, paranoid, miserly and psychopathic as Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, inventor of Scientology and Dianetics. Every story he told about himself was a lie — and ...
Sep 1, 1987
Thugs tried to stop me exposing evil cult // --- says Scientology follower who quit after 22 years
More: link
Type: Press
THE author of a book that allegedly blows the whistle on the bizarre founder of the Church of Scientology says he has been terrorized by cult fanatics seeking to suppress the shocking exposé. "They've sent out thugs to intimidate me, threatened my family, tried to bribe us and even tried to jail the publisher," says Bent Corydon, author of L. Ron Hubbard: Messiah Or Madman? (Lyle Stuart). Corydon, a loyal disciple of Hubbard and his cult for nearly 22 years, now ...
Jun 21, 1987
Hubbard's 7th 'Voyage' is an awful trip — Orlando Sentinel
Type: Press
Author(s): Joe Kilsheimer
Source: Orlando Sentinel
The late L. Ron Hubbard was a respectable science fiction writer in the 1940s and '50s. He published a number of stories in Astounding Stories, the magazine in which some of SF's leading lights, such as Frank Herbert, Issac Asimov and Robert Heinlein, published their early works. In the mid-1950s, however, Hubbard turned his mind in on itself and developed the self-help doctrine of Dianetics, which later developed into the cult religion Scientology. After more than two decades out of science ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.