Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “Lawsuit”

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auditing • church of scientology of california (csc) • copyright, trademark, patent • cost • david miscavige • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • gerald "gerry" armstrong • heber c. jentzsch • internal revenue service (irs) • julie christofferson titchbourne • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawrence "larry" wollersheim • lawsuit • lisa mcpherson • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • michael j. flynn • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operation snow white • protest, picket • religious technology center (rtc) • sea organization (sea org, so) • settlement • silencing criticism, censorship • tax matter
Reference materials Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation (SLAPP)
1236 matching items found.
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Page of 42: ⇑ Latest         
Mar 20, 1991
Allan Anthony Buttnor vs. Janice "Kelly" Gariepy, Reed Leary, Ken Montgomery
Type: Legal
LENNIE & CO. ID: 4034266977 JUN 20 '94 9:48 No.001 P.02 IN THE COURT OF QUEEN'S BENCH OF ALBERTA JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF EDMONTON BETWEEN: ALLAN ANTHONY BUTTNOR, Plaintiff, - and - JANICE "KELLY" GARIEPY, REED LEARY, and KEN MONTGOMERY, Defendants. STATEMENT OF CLAIM 1. The Plaintiff is a resident of the City of Edmonton, in the Province of Alberta, and is an ordained minister of the Church of Scientology of Alberta, who seeks to minister to the spiritual needs of the ...
Feb 13, 1991
Scientologists sued twice this week — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Curtis Krueger
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
The Church of Scientology promised a Michigan man he would achieve "spiritual immortality" - but first, according to a new lawsuit, he had to pay thousands. Clearwater is considered the spiritual headquarters for Scientology, which members say is a religion, but which critics say is a money-making outfit or a cult. It was founded by L. Ron Hubbard, a science fiction writer and author of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. When he came to Clearwater, the lawsuit said, he ...
Jan 1, 1991
Scientologists are sued for $127,000 — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Curtis Krueger, Teresa Burney
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Five companies are suing the Church of Scientology for more than $127,000, claiming that the organization has failed to pay its bills for construction work and equipment. Besides those lawsuits, the Scientologists have settled five others within the past two years from companies that claimed they were owed more than $39,000 for items ranging from travel services to construction materials. Scientology was founded by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, the author of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. Scientologists ...
Dec 31, 1990
Church of Scientology facing suits / Five companies say Scientologists haven't paid their bills. The group denies it is having financial difficulties. — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: news.google.com
Dec 29, 1990
Judge orders Ritalin attorneys to pay $27,000 — Glendale News-Press (California)
Dec 12, 1990
'Management seminar' horrowing experience — Cherokee County Herald (Alabama)
More: news.google.com, news.google.com, link
Nov 9, 1990
State board blocked in Narconon case // Ruling throws out licensing recommendation — Daily Oklahoman
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Michael McNutt
Source: Daily Oklahoman
Efforts to license a Kay County substance abuse center operating without state approval were brought to a halt Thursday. The State Mental Health Board, scheduled to act Thursday on certifying the Narconon Chilocco New Life Center, found itself crippled by a court ruling. The ruling blocked the board from using material prepared by Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services staff on the 75-bed facility. Mental health department officials said it was the first time a court tossed out a ...
Oct 16, 1990
Court won't revive Scientology suit — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Aug 3, 1990
Selling good will, or Dianetics? // Major games sponsor outrages some by its link to Scientology — Seattle Times
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Marla Williams, Carol M. Ostrom
Source: Seattle Times
There is Pepsi-Cola, there is Gillette, there is Eastman Kodak and Fruit Of The Loom. And then there is Dianetics. Wherever there has been Goodwill Games, there has been Dianetics. As one of 12 worldwide sponsors of the international athletic competition, Dianetics has been very visible — on television screens, the sides of buses, banners, even behind the goal of the Tri-Cities hockey rink. In the University District earlier this week, a huge tent at Northeast 50th Street and University Way ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jul 15, 1990
Scientologists in dirty tricks campaign — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Richard Palmer, Richard Caseby
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
THE Church of Scientology, a religious cult accused of brainwashing its devotees, has paid private detectives more than £100,000 to organise a worldwide "dirty tricks" campaign against a Sunday Times journalist. Documents seen by The Sunday Times detail how Russell Miller, journalist and author of a book on scientology's founder, L. Ron Hubbard, has been secretly pursued around the world by investigators and members of the sect for the past three years. A former employee of the church, ...
Jul 1, 1990
Psychiatry and Scientology — The Southern California Psychiatrist
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Louis Jolyon West
Source: The Southern California Psychiatrist
The Church of Scientology began as a pseudo-scientific healing cult, Dianetics, described by L. Ron Hubbard, a science fiction writer, in his best-selling book "Dianetics: The Modern science of Mental Health" (1950). At first, Dianetics attracted followers by promising to cure psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders through a procedure called "dianetic auditing," based on pop-psychology, hypnosis, and cybernetics. Hubbard's theory as based on the principle that people can achieve health through abolishing ("clearing") negative influences ("engrams") from their minds by going back ...
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // A Lawyer Learns What It's Like to Fight the Church — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Joseph Yanny represented the movement until a falling out. Now he says lengthy litigation and mysterious harassment indicate he's become 'Public Enemy No. 1.' Los Angeles attorney Joseph Yanny was driving through rural Ohio in the pre-dawn hours in 1988 when he was pulled over by police, who had received a tip that he was carrying a cache of cocaine and guns in his rental car. A telephone caller had supplied authorities in Ohio with Yanny's name, the car's description and ...
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // Neither Side Blinks in a Lengthy Feud — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Among its many adversaries, the Church of Scientology's longest-running feud has been with the Internal Revenue Service. So far, neither combatant has blinked. Over the past three decades, the IRS has revoked the tax-exempt status of various Scientology organizations, accusing them of operating in a commercial manner and of financially benefiting private individuals. From the late 1960s through mid-1970s, IRS agents classified Scientology as a "tax resister" and "subversive," a characterization later deemed improper by a judge. In 1984, the IRS's ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // On the Offensive Against an Array of Suspected Foes — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
"Never treat a war like a skirmish. Treat all skirmishes like wars." —L. Ron Hubbard The Church of Scientology does not turn the other cheek. Ministers mingle with private detectives. "Sacred scriptures" counsel the virtues of combativeness. Parishioners double as paralegals for litigious church attorneys. Consider the passage that a prominent Scientology minister selected from the religion's scriptures, authored by the late L. Ron Hubbard, to inspire the faithful during a gala church event. "People attack Scientology," the minister quoted Hubbard ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 1990
The Scientology Story: Reaching into Society // Church Seeks Influence in Schools, Business, Science — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members. The campaign relies on official church programs and a ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 25, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Selling of a Church // Church Markets Its Gospel With High-Pressure Sales — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Behind the religious trappings, the Church of Scientology is run like a lean, no-nonsense business in which potential members are called "prospects," "raw meat" and "bodies in the shop." Its governing financial policy, written by the late Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, is simple and direct: "MAKE MONEY, MAKE MORE MONEY, MAKE OTHERS PRODUCE SO AS TO MAKE MONEY." The organization uses sophisticated sales tactics to sell a seemingly endless progression of expensive courses, each serving as a prerequisite for the ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: A Special Report // About This Series — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Scientology Story. Today: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard. First in a six-part series. The Times today begins a six-part series on the Church of Scientology, the controversial religion founded by the late author L. Ron Hubbard. Since its creation nearly four decades ago, Scientology has grown into a worldwide movement that, in recent months, has spent millions of dollars promoting its founder and his self-help book, "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health." In the past five years alone, ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 4: The Final Days — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Deep in hiding, Hubbard kept tight grip on the church. Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard often said that man's most basic drive is that of survival. And when it came to his own, he used whatever was necessary — false identities, cover stories, deception. There is no better illustration of this than the way he secretly controlled the Church of Scientology while hiding from a world he viewed as increasingly hostile. Hubbard was last seen publicly in February 1980, in the ...
May 27, 1990
Court clears Hubbard book for publishing — Mesa Tribune
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Mesa Tribune
NEW YORK — An upcoming critical biography of L. Ron Hubbard, author and founder of the Church of Scientology, may be published in its original form, a federal appeals court ruled. The 2nd us. Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a lower court's ruling in February for New Era Publications International, exclusive licensee of Hubbard's works, which had filed a copyright infringement lawsuit. Hubbard died in 1986. The appeals court held Thursday the book's quotations from Hubbard's published works, which amount to ...
May 27, 1990
Publisher victorious on Hubbard biography — New York Times
More: link
Type: Press
Source: New York Times
A Federal appeals court has ruled that a publisher is not required to delete material from a coming biography of L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology. The ruling, issued Thursday, overturned a lower court's decision, and barring the unlikely chance of a rehearing or a quick reversal by the Supreme Court, the biography will be published in its original form next month. Michael Lee Hertzberg, who argued the case against the publisher, said the plaintiff had not decided ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
May 25, 1990
Law [Copyrighted writings can be used in critical biography...] — Wall Street Journal
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Wade Lambert, Edward Felsenthal
Source: Wall Street Journal
[...] COPYRIGHTED WRITINGS can be used in critical biography, court rules. A federal appeals court in New York reversed a lower court ruling that appeared to signify tighter restrictions on the use of copyrighted materials by authors and journalists. The appeals court ruled that Carol Publishing Group's critical biography of L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology, doesn't violate federal law by including copyrighted quotations from Mr. Hubbard's published writings. The plaintiff was New Era Publications International, a Copenhagen ...
May 11, 1990
Torts // Claims against church and affiliates by ex-members properly dismissed — Daily Journal (Los Angeles, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: Daily Journal (Los Angeles, California)
The C.A. 2nd has upheld dismissal of a complaint filed by former members of the Church of Scientology that was based on allegations of fraud, disclosure of confidential confessions and the diversion of church funds. Six individuals, a nonprofit organization, and a 400-member class sued 14 individuals, six nonprofit organizations, two corporations and five other entities for fraud, breach of fiduciary duty, and injunctive relief. The claims were based on allegations that the plaintiffs had been induced to join the Church ...
Apr 15, 1990
Critics, government call Scientology business masquerading as religion — San Diego Union-Tribune
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Mike McIntyre
Source: San Diego Union-Tribune
The Church of Scientology's genesis was the 1950 best seller by L. Ron Hubbard, "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health." Church officials claim there are 7 million Scientologists worldwide, but former members allege there may be fewer than 100,000. The church promotes Scientology as a religion — one not based on the worship of a god but on the belief in "scientific" principles applied to the mind. Hubbard argued in "Dianetics" that inner turmoil springs from subconscious mental images, or ...
Apr 15, 1990
Search for information followed long, winding trail — San Diego Union-Tribune
More: link
Type: Press
Source: San Diego Union-Tribune
The San Diego Union first asked for an interview with Bridge Publications in December 1989. The request was referred to the L. Ron Hubbard Office of Public Relations, a Church of Scientology organization in Los Angeles. Several times throughout January, Union reporter Mike McIntyre contacted the L Ron Hubbard Office of Public Relations to request an interview with Bridge personnel. Each time, L. Ron Hubbard spokeswoman Sharyn Runyon said that a decision had not been made. Runyon later asked McIntyre to ...
Apr 3, 1990
Ex-employees describe abuse in suit against est's Erhard — San Francisco Chronicle (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Don Lattin
Source: San Francisco Chronicle (California)
Former employees of EST founder Werner Erhard say they were forced to obey the pop psychology guru in a manner akin to God and to submit themselves to numerous instances of verbally and physically abusive behavior. In sworn statements, the ex-employees also charge that they were required to worship Erhard as the Source and were controlled with exhausting work schedules, loyalty oaths, threats and emotional abuse. The allegations – by five former staff members of est, of the Forum and of ...
Mar 12, 1990
Who is the owner of the written word? — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bob Sipchen
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Imagine that a biographer is rummaging through an old trunk. He discovers a previously unseen letter from George Washington to Martha. He unfolds the brittle pages. "Martha, I must tell you, I was fibbing when I said, 'I cannot tell a lie.' " When that hypothetical biography is published, will you, the book buyer, get to read the Founding Father's confession? Hard to say. Last month the Supreme Court refused to review an appeals court ruling that copyright law strictly limits ...
Mar 8, 1990
Harold's Journal: Premonitions... — Newkirk Herald Journal (Oklahoma)
More: link
Feb 21, 1990
Curbs stand on unpublished writings — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Feb 21, 1990
Justices permit strict curbs on use of unpublished writing — Washington Post
Jan 31, 1990
Copyright dispute blocks biography of Scientology founder — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.