Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “R2-45”

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apollo (formerly, "royal scot man"; often misspelled "royal scotman", "royal scotsman") • arthur j. maren • auditing • blackmail • cost • dead agenting (black pr, smear campaign) • disconnection • e-meter • ethics (scientology) • fair game • internal revenue service (irs) • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • medical claims • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operating thetan (ot) • operation snow white • paulette cooper • r2-45 • sea organization (sea org, so) • security check ("sec check") • supernatural abilities (aka ot powers) • suppressive person (sp) • the creation of human ability (book)
Reference materials R2-45
16 matching items found.
Dateless  1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
All time 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14
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Jan 30, 2008
Malignant narcissism, L. Ron Hubbard, and Scientology's policies of narcissistic rage
Type: Research
Author(s): Stephen A. Kent, Jodi M. Lane
In this article, we argue that Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, likely presented a personality disorder known as malignant narcissism, and then we establish that this disorder probably contributed to his creation of organizational policies against perceived enemies that reflected his narcissistic rage. We illustrate our argument by discussing Hubbard’s creation of an internal Scientology organization called the Guardian’s Office, which carried out a sustained and covert attack against a Scientology critic, Paulette Cooper. This attack, and the Scientology policies that ...
Feb 4, 1994
Scientology Stories: Lorna Levett
Type: Account
[This appears to be an OCR'ed version of a paper document. I wish to find a copy of the original document in order to fix the typos troughout.] —– To Whom It May Concern To the best of my memory - I, Lorna Levett was a Scientologist from 1961 to 1974, from 1966 to 1974 full time, from 1968 to 1974 a franchise holder and received rewards for being the top recruiter on the planet 1969 to 1970. In late 1969/early ...
Jul 14, 1982
Inside Scientology: Son of Scientology — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
He's been called the Son of Scientology. His name has been changed from L. Ron Hubbard, Jr., to Ron DeWolf, and he's the firstborn son of the former science fiction writer who founded the Church of Scientology. It's been 23 years since hes seen his father, and he suspects that the founder of what many people call a destructive cult may, in truth, be dead. "To be perfectly frank, my life's been pretty much of a disaster and a miserable mess ...
Jul 7, 1982
Inside Scientology: "Attack the Attacker" — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
Several former policies of the Church of Scientology, founded by L. Ron Hubbard, have persistently tainted its public image. Scientologists say these policies were either "jokes" from the very beginning, or were misunderstood by the public — and in any case they have all been canceled. Most of these policies involve ways the Church deals with people it has labeled "Potential Trouble Sources" and "Suppressive Persons." The latter are "those who are destructively antisocial" or those who "actively seek to suppress ...
Jun 9, 1982
Inside Scientology: Is it a religion, a science fiction fantasy, or just another cult? — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
The year was 1950. The book was Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, written by a 39-year-old "pulp" writer of science fiction, L. Ron Hubbard. A few months earlier, Hubbard had outlined the book's tenets in a magazine called Astounding Science Fiction. And a year before that, at a lecture for science fiction writers, Hubbard had mused, "Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wanted to make a million dollars, the best way would be ...
May 8, 1982
City of Clearwater 1982 Hearings - Church of Scientology: LaVenda Van Schaick
Sep 14, 1981
Preliminary report to the Clearwater city commission re: The power of a municipality to regulate organizations claiming tax exempt or non-profit status
Aug 28, 1978
'Fair Game' policy // Scientology critics assail belligerence — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Rawitch, Robert Gillette
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
"If anyone is getting industrious trying to enturbulate (sic) or stop Scientology or its activities, I can make Captain Bligh look like a Sunday-school teacher. There is probably no limit on what I would do to safeguard Man's only road to freedom against persons who . . . seek to stop Scientology or hurt Scientologists." — L. Ron Hubbard, Aug. 15, 1967 It was not the first time that private investigator Eual R. Harrow had interviewed jurors following a verdict, but ...
May 1, 1978
An author vs. Scientology church — San Francisco Chronicle (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: San Francisco Chronicle (California)
In the fall of 1971, author Paulette Cooper came out with a book called "The Scandal of Scientology" and, then, according to her lawyers, friends, family and lawyers, the following things happened to her: She received repeated telephone calls from anonymous people who threatened to kill her. Letters were posted on her neighbors' doors telling them she had venereal disease and should be evicted from her apartment. Her publisher was sued and harassed to the point that he withdrew the ...
Apr 5, 1976
A Sci-Fi Faith — TIME Magazine
Type: Press
Source: TIME Magazine
The mystery began to unfold last fall in sleepy, sun-drenched Clearwater, Fla. The Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp. decided to buy the 270-room Fort Harrison Hotel, a downtown landmark, and a nearby bank building. Southern Land stated that the hotel would stay open, but another spokesman announced that it would become a center for the United Churches of Florida, a new ecumenical outfit that soon won endorsement from twelve local clergymen. When 200 tight-lipped strangers moved into the hotel, rumors ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Mar 21, 1976
Process R2-45 – An Inside Joke Or The Ultimate Retribution? — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
Type: Press
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
Through "auditing" (counseling), a Scientologist strives to separate the spirit from the body. The most mysterious — and potentially most macabre — auditing process is R2-45. Though a Scientology spokesman says it should not be taken seriously, auditing process R2-45 is a special order directing scientologists to shoot disruptive foes. John McLean, a former Scientologist, said he saw the order while a member and believed that is what it meant. His mother Nan, also a former Scientologist, said she was told ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 1, 1974
Fear and Loathing in Sutton: The McLean family's fight to escape Scientology — Macleans
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John Saunders
Source: Macleans
The McLean family first became involved in Scientology in 1969, when Nan, an energetic grandmother, joined the cult. Her husband, Eric, their two sons and their daughter-in-law followed. Eric McLean is a soft-spoken, 52-year-old teacher of auto mechanics now on leave to work for the Ontario high-school teachers' federation. He and Nan live in an old farmhouse outside the village of Sutton, north of Toronto. By 1972, the five McLeans were pillars of the Church of Scientology. Nan drove 100 ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Oct 26, 1972
Books / Inside Scientology — Rolling Stone
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): William S. Burroughs
Source: Rolling Stone
[Picture / Caption: Burroughs using a Scientology E-Meter: "All this time I felt my self-respect slipping away from me and finally completely gone . . . officially removed. . . "] Inside Scientology by Robert Kaufman Olympia Press. 279 pp. BY WILLIAM BURROUGHS The upper levels of Scientology processing are classified as "confidential," which means that only those who have completed the lower grades, passed security checks, and paid the large fees in advance are allowed to see and run this ...
Jan 1, 1970
Scientology: the Now Religion - Chapter 6: Techniques, drills, and processes — Delacorte Press
Sep 29, 1969
Scientology: Total freedom and beyond — The Nation
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Donovan Bess
Source: The Nation
DONOVAN BESS Mr. Bess is on the staff of the San Francisco Chronicle. San Francisco This is the year of Apollo 11. It is also the year in which that psychological sophisticate, Richard Alpert, came back from his guru in India to reap a big following of inner-space explorers with his story of spiritual conversion. It is a lime of burgeoning meditation societies on the college campuses, and of passionate rebellion against the amorality of our technology. Thus it ...
Jan 1, 1968
The Shrinking World of L. Ron Hubbard (TV) — Granada Television (UK)
More: transcript
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.