Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “Space opera”

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anti-psychiatry • auditing • battlefield earth • cost • dianetics • e-meter • federal bureau of investigation (fbi) • food and drug administration (fda) • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • income • internal revenue service (irs) • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • medical claims • membership • mental illness • narconon (aka scientology drug rehab) • operating thetan (ot) • operation snow white • recruitment • sea organization (sea org, so) • space opera • supernatural abilities (aka ot powers) • xenu (operating thetan level 3, ot 3, wall of fire)
26 matching items found.
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Dec 15, 2009
Scientology: 'The Crusade' continues — Gawker
Aug 14, 2008
The History Of Xenu, As Explained By L. Ron Hubbard In 8 Minutes — Gawker
Feb 23, 2006
Inside Scientology — Rolling Stone
Type: Press
Author(s): Janet Reitman
Source: Rolling Stone
The faded little downtown area of Clearwater, Florida, has a beauty salon, a pizza parlor and one or two run-down bars, as well as a bunch of withered bungalows and some old storefronts that look as if they haven't seen customers in years. There are few cars and almost no pedestrians. There are, however, buses — a fleet of gleaming white and blue ones that slowly crawl through town, stopping at regular intervals to discharge a small army of tightly organized, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 2005
Tom Cruise discusses psychiatry, Scientology — CBC News
Type: Press
Source: CBC News
Actor Tom Cruise sparred with Today show host Matt Lauer last week over the merits of psychiatry. Although his ostensible reason for appearing on the morning show was to promote this week's release of War of the Worlds, Cruise got into a heated debate when Lauer brought up comments that Cruise has made in the past about depression. The on-air argument is the latest in a growing number of interviews in which Cruise, known for his roles in movies like ''Minority ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 28, 1999
John Travolta's alien nation — Washington Post
Jan 20, 1998
Web not helping Scientology — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Jan 19, 1998
Scientology seeks tax-receipt status — Globe and Mail (Canada)
More: link
Sep 2, 1991
Scientologists emerge as creators of mystery-shrouded movie firm — Los Angeles Business Journal
Type: Press
Author(s): Anne Rackham
Source: Los Angeles Business Journal
Scientologists emerge as creators of mystery-shrouded movie firm Is it just a movie company, this one owned and run by members of a controversial church? Or is it a front? Future Films, the mysterious movie company that arrived in Burbank and in Garland, Texas, last month with ambitious goals and a huge marketing splash, is financed and managed by a small group of high-level members of the Church of Scientology. Critics of the church, who label the religion a cult and ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 1, 1991
Petrolia's new neighbors – L. Ron Hubbard's followers, the Church of Spiritual Technology — North Coast Journal
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Joe Cempa
Source: North Coast Journal
Petrolia — A few miles outside of this coastal community, a massive 400-foot subterranean vault constructed of steel and concrete lies beneath a peaceful knoll overlooking the Pacific. The breadth and dimension of the vault stagger the imagination: 100 feet longer than a football field and 20 feet in diameter, the two-story sarcophagus is almost complete. It is designed to withstand the ravages of nature as well as man-made destruction. Humboldt County is now home to one of the most impregnable ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Defining the Theology — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
What is Scientology? Not even the vast majority of Scientologists can fully answer the question. In the Church of Scientology, there is no one book that comprehensively sets forth the religion's beliefs in the fashion of, say, the Bible or the Koran. Rather, Scientology's theology is scattered among the voluminous writings and tape-recorded discourses of the late science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, who founded the religion in the early 1950s. Piece by piece, his teachings are revealed to church members ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Nov 8, 1987
Messiah at the Manor [excerpt from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"] — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
Scientology grew out of the ashes of L Ron Hubbard's 'new science' of Dianetics, which enjoyed a brief vogue in the America of the 1950s then faded to bring its founder close to bankruptcy. In this second extract from the book the Church of Scientology tried to ban, RUSSELL MILLER describes the bizarre, science-fiction basis of the new, highly profitable religion and Hubbard's self-appointed mission to 'save the world' —– L RON HUBBARD had often said: "If a man really wanted ...
Mar 15, 1987
A mystery / Hubbard's purple prose is still selling volumes — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Frank Catalano
Source: Seattle Times
The writings of L. Ron Hubbard are a mystery. Not the writings on Dianetics and Scientology, topics on which the late Hubbard wrote dozens of books and manuals. No, the mystery is Hubbard’s science-fiction writing — specifically, why it’s selling so well. Before his death last year, Hubbard celebrated his 50 years in writing by producing “Battlefield Earth,” an 800-page tome that critics suggested was a better doorstop than book. That was followed, because of what Hubbard called “enthusiastic response,” by ...
Nov 5, 1985
Scientologists block access to secret documents // 1,500 crowd into courthouse to protect materials on fundamental beliefs — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
In one of the largest court demonstrations in Los Angeles in years, about 1,500 Church of Scientology members crammed three floors of the County Courthouse on Monday, effectively blocking public access to documents that the church considers secret and sacred. For hours, Scientologists swamped workers in the clerk's office with hundreds of requests to photocopy the documents, which reveal some of the organization's most fundamental beliefs. Scientology attorneys have argued that disclosure of the materials is a violation of the group's ...
Mar 7, 1983
Sect's missing founder leaves legal morass — Washington Post
Type: Press
Author(s): Jay Mathews
Source: Washington Post
Three years ago, somewhere near this dusty little town of watermelon fields and senior citizen trailer parks, a pudgy, prolific science fiction writer named L. Ron Hubbard climbed into a black van and reportedly disappeared from sight. Nobody in Hemet, 80 miles east of Los Angeles, or anywhere else might have cared about the fate of a 71-year-old eccentric with a lust for privacy, except that Hubbard was the founder of one of the word's wealthiest and most controversial new religions. ...
Jun 9, 1982
Inside Scientology: Is it a religion, a science fiction fantasy, or just another cult? — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
The year was 1950. The book was Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, written by a 39-year-old "pulp" writer of science fiction, L. Ron Hubbard. A few months earlier, Hubbard had outlined the book's tenets in a magazine called Astounding Science Fiction. And a year before that, at a lecture for science fiction writers, Hubbard had mused, "Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wanted to make a million dollars, the best way would be ...
Jun 9, 1982
Inside Scientology: The story of Scientology might make a great movie — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
The film would star a former science fiction writer named L. Ron Hubbard who founded a religion — or what his critics call a "cult." Also included in the cast would be Charles Manson, John Travolta, numerous former cultists turned "deprogrammers," and billions of Thetans, or immortal beings trapped in "meat bodies" on the planet earth — and don't forget Hubbard's renegade son, who works in a Nevada casino and suspects his father is either dead or hopelessly insane. Scenery in ...
Sep 1, 1981
Scientology: The sickness spreads — Reader's Digest
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Eugene H. Methvin
Source: Reader's Digest
Eighteen months ago, the U.S.-based Church of Scientology launched a global—and unsuccessful—campaign to prevent publication of a Reader's Digest report called "Scientology: Anatomy of a Frightening Cult." The church engaged a detective agency to investigate the author, Digest Senior Editor Eugene H. Methvin. Digest offices in a half-dozen nations were picketed or bombarded with nuisance phone calls. In Denmark, South Africa and Australia, the church sued unsuccessfully to prevent publication. In the months since the article appeared, in May 1980, a ...
Aug 30, 1981
Sect courses resemble science fiction — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
Type: Press
Author(s): Richard Leiby
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
At the Fort Harrison Hotel in downtown Clearwater, Scientologists are learning to leave their bodies, control other people's thoughts and communicate with plant life. They learn this by reliving a galactic holocaust carried out by space creatures millions of years ago. So say top-secret Scientology documents spelling out the highest level of training available to church members. It is training that costs thousands of dollars and, according to church defectors who provided the documents, amounts to nothing but a swindle dreamed ...
Mar 16, 1976
Scientology / Scientology's founding father (third in a series) — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Dec 17, 1970
Scientology: The Now Religion! — Village Voice
Type: Press
Author(s): Donald M. Kaplan
Source: Village Voice
The true measures of the false prophet are an unrelenting certainty and a staggering income. The immediate impression of L. Ron Hubbard, the prophet of Scientology, which emerges from George Malko's "Scientology: The Now Religion," is of a windbag hustler. There is not a single question Hubbard cannot answer easily and definitively. This and the fact that Hubbard personally has been making something around $140,000 a week from Scientology (that is, as Malko tells is, week in and week out) I ...
Jan 1, 1970
Scientology: the Now Religion - Chapter 5: The real truth — Delacorte Press
Nov 9, 1969
Scientology -- Cult with millions of followers led by man who claims he's visited heaven twice — National Enquirer
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ralph Lee Smith
Source: National Enquirer
How profitable Scientology has become is one of the organization's most closely guarded secrets, but estimates of the personal worth of founder L. Ron Hubbard have ranged up to $7 million. In 1963 the Internal Revenue Service claimed the church earned more than $750,000 in the United States from 1955 through 1959, the year Hubbard moved international headquarters from Washington, D.C., to England. There, according to the Los Angeles Times, world receipts rose to $140,000 weekly in 1968. —– In New ...
Dec 1, 1968
SCIENTOLOGY – Menace to Mental health — Today's Health
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Ralph Lee Smith
Source: Today's Health
Couched in pseudoscientific terms and rites, this dangerous cult claims to help mentally or emotionally disturbed persons—for sizable fees. Scientology has grown into a very profitable worldwide enterprise . . . and a serious threat to health. [Picture / Caption: L. Ronald Hubbard, Scientology's founder.] [Picture / Caption: Bust of Hubbard flanks "altar" in Scientology "church" near London. Among his accomplishments, Hubbard claims to have been dead and recovered, to have visited Venus and heaven.] LAST SUMMER in New York City, ...
Oct 16, 1965
Ron's Scientologists — The Bulletin (Australia)
Oct 6, 1965
Report calls for ban on scientology — The Australian
Mar 27, 1953
Arrest gives pair fine new engrams — Detroit Free Press
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.